• Important Update: Our New Email Domain

    Please note: We've updated our email domain to familyhistory.email. All our emails will be from this domain.

  • Do you love Genealogy? Why not write for us? we're looking for volunteers to write articles for Family history. Please contact us for further information.

1939 registration.

No, not a rip off.
For some years now all government departments have had to recover costs when supplying information.
The £43 is in line with what used to be paid for information from unreleased census in the 1990s (allowing for inflation).

The UK taxpayer should not be expected to subsidise a person's hobby.

I know a number of companies are wanting to provide an online service and based on past experience expect to see such a service in the coming year.
Cheers
Guy


Hi Guy,

£43 :eek:
Wouldnt they be better of charging a smaller fee and getting more customers hence in the long run a bigger turn over? :confused:
Or it doesnt work like that?

gibbo
 
Last edited:
Hi gibbo

At least I wasn't being stupid. I think £42 is a rip off and I certainly won't be paying it.
Hopefully these records will be available through ancestry or a similar site soon.

Sam

Hi Sam,
Im wont be paying that much neither. If it was cheaper i would probably think about it.

gibbo
 
As a UK taxpayer I expect to get some advantages for the vast sums of money I give to the government.
It may only be a hobby but at least I am not expecting the government to subsidise a life style.
 
Hi Guy,

£43 :eek:
Wouldnt they be better of charging a smaller fee and getting more customers hence in the long run a bigger turn over? :confused:
Or it doesnt work like that?

gibbo

No it doesn't work like that.
The records are not part of a database or even part of the NHS core business.

The records are part of a stored archive, sitting un-indexed on shelves.
Using past experience of similar types of records (for example unreleased census) the costs were calculted for finding and retrieving and individual record.
During the early 1990s this worked out at an average of £29.00p.
Taking into account increase of wages inflation etc. the current cost averages £43.00p.

That is simply a cost to retrieve the record. No profit margin has been added as the law only allows for costs to be taken into account.

There are a number of companies who have shown an interest in digitising the records and making them available online. When this happens the costs tumble and the companies will build in a profit margin as happened with the 1911 census.
It is only then that more customers would be an advantage.
Until then researchers wanting access to records are a distraction from the core business of the NHS.
Cheers
Guy
 
No it doesn't work like that.
The records are not part of a database or even part of the NHS core business.

The records are part of a stored archive, sitting un-indexed on shelves.
Using past experience of similar types of records (for example unreleased census) the costs were calculted for finding and retrieving and individual record.
During the early 1990s this worked out at an average of £29.00p.
Taking into account increase of wages inflation etc. the current cost averages £43.00p.

That is simply a cost to retrieve the record. No profit margin has been added as the law only allows for costs to be taken into account.

There are a number of companies who have shown an interest in digitising the records and making them available online. When this happens the costs tumble and the companies will build in a profit margin as happened with the 1911 census.
It is only then that more customers would be an advantage.
Until then researchers wanting access to records are a distraction from the core business of the NHS.
Cheers
Guy


Hi Guy,

I still dont like the £43.00 bit :rolleyes::2fun: but at least i now understand where the costs involved come into it. Thanks.
 
Back
Top