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A5 - Roman Road.

p.risboy

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#1
Whilst hunting for rellies, I usually get a map on screen to see exactly where the towns and villages are, in the places I am looking for in relation to each others localities.

My gaze was drawn to the Roman road of Watling Street(A5). The Romans did an excellent job of building their roads in straight lines where possible.

Unfortunately, the English government over the years have put some serious bends in it around Milton Keynes area. You can still see the original line of the Roman road going through Bletchley, and on to Stony Stratford in Buckinghamshire.

From Canterbury to Shrewsbury, via Tamworth & Cannock, is a fair old stretch of roadway, and the 'modern' A5 continues on to North West Wales from Shrewsbury.

Up and down that road, there is a serious lot of history to be found. (Keep looking Leefer.:2fun: ).

So lets thank the government for making the Roman roads longer, and more windier.:2fun::2fun:


Steve.:)
 

Robesur

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#2
The Romans also built towns about 25 miles apart, a days march in those days, providing overnight accomodation. When I was young, 1950s, I regularly travelled along the A5 from the South East to North Wales. This was before Motorways and few towns had by passes, quite a trek then in old cars. This involved us in that everytime we came to a town our progress was checked as we made our way through shoppers along the High Streets and dodging the local traffic. At least the kinks put in took you around the town and over the years these became linked. We now call this route the M1 and M6. I no longer go to North Wales, they became to anti English and anti cars but I think the old A5 is still the major route there.
 

p.risboy

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#3
That reminds of a 1980 holiday trip I made from Northampton to Anglesey........Trearddur Bay to be precise. Though it would be nice to go the scenic A5 route.

BUT........with a wife and 3 month old baby, plus the dog, and in a Mini Estate car, it took a bit longer than I thought. I think it took about 7 hours, but memory fades a bit about that.

The bit of A5 that was the problem, was from Betws-y-Coed to Bangor. Heavy lorries and no overtaking.:eek::2fun::2fun:

Lovely holiday though, but come back a different way. Over to Chester, and picked up the M6.:rolleyes::2fun::2fun:


Steve.:)
 

woodlander

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#4
I am so young I can claim to have played on the M6 during its construction :2fun:

And Yes, I'm running for cover in anticipation of the witty replies :biggrin:
 

leefer

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#6
Whilst hunting for rellies, I usually get a map on screen to see exactly where the towns and villages are, in the places I am looking for in relation to each others localities.

My gaze was drawn to the Roman road of Watling Street(A5). The Romans did an excellent job of building their roads in straight lines where possible.

Unfortunately, the English government over the years have put some serious bends in it around Milton Keynes area. You can still see the original line of the Roman road going through Bletchley, and on to Stony Stratford in Buckinghamshire.

From Canterbury to Shrewsbury, via Tamworth & Cannock, is a fair old stretch of roadway, and the 'modern' A5 continues on to North West Wales from Shrewsbury.

Up and down that road, there is a serious lot of history to be found. (Keep looking Leefer.:2fun: ).

So lets thank the government for making the Roman roads longer, and more windier.:2fun::2fun:


Steve.:)
:biggrin::biggrin:
 

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