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ARP Warden

dave6023

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#4
Hi Dave what is your fathers name and dob and area, I will look and see if I can find anything, I don't know if you knew what ARP stood for so here it is(Air Raid Precautions) Warden. :) Joyce
Hi Joyce

My father's name is William Stuart Hoare DoB 14th August 1900, Lambeth. As far as I know he was living in or near Harrow. I guess he was around that area during the Blitz as I remember seeing a log book of air raids that started off with lots of blank pages and an occasional entry, then just page after page filled with details of air raids. At some point he moved to Dunstable in Bedfordshire but I don't know if this was before, during or after WW2. I also know he joined the Middlesex Regiment in 1918.

Regards
Dave
 
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#5
Hi Dave,

I am still looking but now that I know how to attach here you might want this.:2fun:

William Stuart Hoare
Age: 18
Birth Year: abt 1900
Residence : 51 Rosslyn Crescent, Weddstone Middx
Regiment Name: (YS) Middlesex
Regiment Number: 141300
Document Year: 1918

I you haven't noticed this is actually WW1, Arp was in WWII so he must have been in both.
 

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Hi Dave,

Could not find any record either:'( , the site that benny suggested looks goodO0 O0 O0 . I found this piece on them and just thought you might be interested.:biggrin: Joyce

Fact File : Air Raid Precautions
April 1938 - 1945




After World War One, military experts predicted that in any future war there would be large-scale bombing of the British civilian population, resulting in huge casualties. In April 1937, an Air Raid Wardens' Service was created. By the middle of 1938 about 200,000 people were involved, with another half a million enrolling during the Munich Crisis of September 1938. By the outbreak of war there were more than 1.5 million in the ARP (Air Raid Precautions), or Civil Defence as it was later re-named.

The most visible members of the ARP were the air raid wardens. ARP posts were initially set up in the warden’s home, or in a shop or an office, but they were later purpose-built. Each post covered a certain area, varying across the country, but with about ten to the square mile in London. Each post was divided into sectors, with perhaps three to six wardens in each sector. An ARP warden was almost always local - it was essential that he or she knew their sector and the people living there.

Since no significant German air raids followed the outbreak of war in September 1939, the main duties of the ARP wardens in the early months were to register everyone in their sector and enforce the ‘blackout’. This meant making sure that no lights were visible which could be used by enemy planes to help locate bombing targets. These activities led to some ARP wardens being regarded as interfering and nosy.

However, during the Blitz of 1940-1 wardens and other civil defence personnel proved themselves indispensable and heroic. Whenever the air raid sirens sounded, the wardens would help people into the nearest shelter and then tour their sector, usually in pairs, at considerable risk from bombs, shrapnel and falling masonry. They would also check regularly on those in the air raid shelters.

In the aftermath of a raid, ARP wardens would often be first on the scene, carrying out first-aid if there were minor casualties, putting out any small fires and helping to organise the emergency response. Other members of the Civil Defence services included rescue and stretcher (or first-aid) parties, the staff of control centres and messenger boys. Their work often overlapped with the fire and medical services and the WVS (Women's Voluntary Service).

A small percentage of ARP wardens were full-time and were paid a salary, but most were part-time volunteers who carried out their ARP duties as well as full-time jobs. Part-time wardens were supposed to be on duty about three nights a week, but this increased greatly when the bombing was heaviest. One in six was a woman, and amongst the men there were a significant number of veterans of World War One. At the beginning of the war, ARP wardens had no uniform, but wore their own clothes, with the addition of a steel helmet, Wellington boots and an armband. In May 1941 full-time and regular part-time wardens were issued with blue serge uniforms.

The Civil Defence services, including the ARP wardens, were maintained through the war. There were still hundreds of thousands of volunteers in June 1944, although the numbers of full-time personnel had fallen from 127,000 at the height of the Blitz to 70,000 by the end of 1943. In all 1.4 million men and women served as ARP wardens during World War Two.
 

benny1982

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#8
Hi

Many of us will no doubt come across a WW1 soldier so they may have used their experience to become an ARP by the time WW2 broke out, or even just before. If 1.5 million of them served in WW1 then there may be many of us with parents, grandparents or great grandparents who were ARP's.

But finding a record of each individual one might be a challenge as I still dont know if a central register of ARPs were kept. I keep on googling.

Ben
 
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Hi

Many of us will no doubt come across a WW1 soldier so they may have used their experience to become an ARP by the time WW2 broke out, or even just before. If 1.5 million of them served in WW1 then there may be many of us with parents, grandparents or great grandparents who were ARP's.

But finding a record of each individual one might be a challenge as I still dont know if a central register of ARPs were kept. I keep on googling.

Ben
Hi Ben, I spent alot of time googling today on this, I couldn't find any military enlistment for british WWII. I must be dense or something but I went into many sites looking and hoping but came up null:'( Joyce ps I hope you have better luck than me.
 

dave6023

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#10
Joyce & Ben

Many thanks to both of you for your help.

Looks like I sent you on a wild goose chase.

Still you did come up with some background information on the duties of ARP wardens which I found interesting.

Thanks again to both of you.

Regards
Dave
 

benny1982

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Hi Dave

Your best bet would be to maybe contact the Ministry Of Defence to see whether they hold any ARP individual records, but as many were volunteers, even though a count was kept of who joined up, they may have thrown the registers away after the war once the statistical info on how many ARPs they were was calculated. Or some were lost or even bombed.

Ben
 

dave6023

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#12
Whilst searching for an old photo album of mine (which I failed to find), I have found some documents relating to my father's ARP service.
I have 2 certificates issued in the County of Bedford relating to courses he attended which confirm he was living in Dunstable during WW2. One certificate relates to a Short Course in elementary First Aid in July 1943, the other is for a Supplementary Instructor (Fire Guard) in October 1942.
I also have 2 letters relating to the disbanding of the Civil Defence General Services and an Order of the Day.
 
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#13
I know I am 9 years too late for this post but I am in the process of searching for my Grand Uncle who moved from Ireland to London in the late 1930s and was never heard from again. My eldest uncle who is now in his mod 80s told me that he was told as a child that my rand Uncle used to put out flares during the blitz so I am assuming he was an air raid warden, I have done extensive research and the last definitive record I have of him was in the 1939 register in St.Pancras London where he listed as a railway porter. Im hoping anyone could tell me where I could get some more info on if he was actually a air raid warden ?

Thanks in advance
Ken
 

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