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Augustus Riches

pee wee

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#1
Can anyone do a lookup for me please for Augustus Riches B 1859 in Freebridge Lynn, Norfolk. Have found him living with his parents in Leziate, Norfolk on the 1861 & 1871 census then he disappears. I haven't been able to find him in deaths or marriages. Any ideas would be welcome.

Peta
 
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#3
This may be him if he joined the army. Not much detail I'm afraid

Boer War 1899-1902 - Soldier details

Name: Riches, A, Corporal, number 7977
Unit: Royal Army Medical Corps

Medal roll: 219 page 0

dave
 
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#4
Hi Peta

The Times, Saturday, Oct 03, 1874; pg. 10; Issue 28124; col D
CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER. – At an inquest held
Before Mr. Beloe, coroner, at King’s Lynn, yesterday,
a verdict of “Manslaughter” was returned against three
labourers named Lake, Seaman and Tag in reference
to the death of Augustus Riches, aged 15. The evidence
showed that the deceased and three men were fellow
labourers, and on the 22nd of August were working in a
harvest field at Grimston, a village near Lynn. Riches took
some beans from a heap belonging to Lake, who told him
if he repeated the offence he would “swing” him. Riches
did so, whereupon Lake, with Seaman and Tag, seized hold
of his feet and head and swung backwards and for-
wards three or four times, and then bumped him violently
on the ground, fracturing his hip. He died in great pain,
on Thursday. The prisoners are in custody and will be
tried at Norwich Assizes.

Similar article in county papers.

The Bury and Norwich Post, and Suffolk Herald (Bury Saint Edmunds, England), Tuesday, October 06, 1874; pg. 3; Issue 4815. (1221 words). 19th Century British Library Newspapers: Part II.

Leicester Chronicle and the Leicestershire Mercury (Leicester, England), Saturday, October 10, 1874; pg. 4; Issue 3402. (3245 words). 19th Century British Library Newspapers: Part II.

cheers
crankypants
 

pee wee

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#5
Thanks everyone, :)
Steve I had, had much the same results, :( Dave I had wondered about whether he had enlisted but couldn't find much. Crankypants The newspaper article looks promising the ages match & so does the area. Where can i access them online or do I have to subscribe to something. Would like to view the other articles you mentioned. If they mention family I might be able to match up more detail. The family didn't seem to move to far from home base & I must admit I never even considered finding a mention of him in a manslaughter article. :eek: Wonder why he still doesn't show up in deaths :?
 
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#8

pee wee

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#9
Hi Crankypants,

Thanks for that. Have applied just have to wait for the card to arrive. In that artical you posted it said the prisoners would be tried at the Norwich Assizes which I gather means courthouse. Do you know of a good site to look up the trial. If one exists.

Cheers Peta
 
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#10
Hi Peta

I did a search through "The Bury and Norwich Post, and Suffolk Herald (Bury Saint Edmunds, England)" and found no further articles relating to a trial.
This may be why, found a LAKE and SEAMAN in 1875 acquitted. No sign of TAG, not sure if index complete.

England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892
Name: Frederick Lake
Date of Trial: 31 Mar 1875
Trial Year: 1875
Location of Trial: Norfolk, England
Sentence: Acquittal
Offence: Manslaughter
Aquitted: No True Bill

England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892
Name: John Seaman
Date of Trial: 31 Mar 1875
Trial Year: 1875
Location of Trial: Norfolk, England
Sentence: Acquittal
Offence: Manslaughter
Aquitted: No True Bill

Define "No true bill"
At common law, and in many states, a grand jury can return charges in either of two ways. One is to vote on a set of charges submitted by a prosecutor; these charges are contained in a proposed indictment, and if the grand jurors decide there is probable cause to support the charges, they vote a "true bill," that is, they vote to return the indictment and initiate a criminal proceeding. If the grand jurors decide there is not probable cause to support the charges, or that the charges should not be pursued for other reasons, they vote a "no true bill," which means the indictment is not returned and no criminal case ensues. In many states, grand juries still have the common law power to charge by presentment; a presentment is a set of charges brought by a grand jury on its own initiative, not at the behest of a prosecutor.

cheers
crankypants
 

pee wee

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#11
Hi Peta

I did a search through "The Bury and Norwich Post, and Suffolk Herald (Bury Saint Edmunds, England)" and found no further articles relating to a trial.
This may be why, found a LAKE and SEAMAN in 1875 acquitted. No sign of TAG, not sure if index complete.

cheers
crankypants
Hi Crankypants,

Thank you.:kissu: Wonder what happened to Tag. This has helped enormously. I will do a look up through the death notices in the paper when I have the card. I'm fairly hopeful it's my Augustus. I've never seen another one. Just want to cover all avenues before I attempt to order a certificate. I am assuming there will be one despite him not appearing in death records.:confused:

Cheers
Peta
 

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