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Consecrated/unconsecrated ground

Nightryder

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#1
My 2x great grandmother Jemima Adelaide is buried in the Welford road cemetary
in Leicester with her 1st husband Henry Lee Quilter,her 2nd husband William Hanson & 1 of her sons Henry Edward Quilter, it is unconsecrated ground.

In another plot in the same cemetary is Jemimas step daughter Quintillia Quilter & 2 children who died as babies Walter Horace Quilter age 8 months & Ada Mary Quilter who died at 10 months, there are also 3 other people in this grave that I do not think are connected to the family,this is consecrated ground.

I have no idea why some family are buried in consecrated ground & others in unconsecrated, does anyone have any ideas why.
Jenn
 

jay

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#2
At one time anyone who was suspected of having committed suicide was not buried in consecrated ground but that doesn't seem applicable in this case.

What is there to indicate that that part of the cemetery was unconsecrated as I'd have thought that a cemetery would constitute consecrated ground?

Jay. :confused:
 

Guy

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#3
It might be due to the order of burial, who was buried first; Jemima Adelaide, 1st husband Henry Lee Quilter, 2nd husband William Hanson her son Henry Edward Quilter?

Was the first person buried C of E?
Was the first person buried Catholic?
Was William Hanson buried first and perhaps the family paying for the burial objected to the 2nd marriage?

Cheers
Guy

Was the plot individually consecrated prior to the first burial?
 
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Nightryder

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#4
Jay & Guy the info I have comes from the cemetery itself,the plot with the children in is a common grave but the grave with the Quilter adults is freehold ,the first burial was Quintillia in 1863 then the babies in 1864 & 1865, Henry Lee was the first in the other plot in 1876 then Henry Edward in 1915, Jemima in 1918 & William Hanson in 1920, Its possible the family were non conformist but that still doesnt explain why the children are not buried in consecrated ground & the adults are, I always thought that consecration was done at the time of burial but im not certain of that.
Jay, my grandmother committed suicide in 1932 but she is buried in consecrated ground.
Jenn
 
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#5
thanks to PaulBeryl for this explanation

Re: common graves

As far as I am aware pauper/common graves are not necessarily in unconsecrated ground. People who committed suicide (when suicide was still a crime), felons who had been executed and in some (but not all) instances stillborn children (who had not been christened) were buried in unconsecrated ground but pauper/common graves could be in either. Church of England churchyards are consecrated grounds but cemeteries are usually divided into two sections; one section is consecrated on opening and is mainly used for Church of England burials and one section is unconsecrated which is used for non-Church of England or atheist burials. However individual plots in the unconsecrated section can be consecrated before burial if the particular faith requires it (e.g. Roman Catholic).

Different types of grave are:

Private Grave
A plot of ground purchased by a person who then had the burial rights to the grave dug in it, confirmed by a parchment certificate or 'grave paper', a duplicate of which was kept by the Burial Grounds Committee. Separate fees would be paid for the plot, for the making of the grave (sometimes as a brick-lined vault), for each burial in it, and for the right to erect a headstone or other monument.

Common Grave
The general term for a grave in which no private burial rights existed. Common graves were .filled over the course of a few days with the bodies of unrelated people who died during that period and whose families could just about afford a very basic burial but not a private grave. No headstone was erected, so the occupants were un-commemorated.

Lock-Up Grave (sometimes called Open Grave)
The cheapest category of common grave. It appears that these graves were not completely filled in after each burial. Instead, a wooden 'door' was locked in place on to some kind of framework around the grave. When the grave was full the contraption was removed so that the grave looked like any other.

Public Grave
Another type of common grave. The grave was filled up completely after each interment, so that the deepest burial involved most work and cost the largest amount.

Inscription Grave
The third type of common grave. This differed from the other two by having a headstone and, as far as I am aware, is very rare (and may actually be restricted to specific localities). The intention was to avoid the 'shame' of an un-commemorated burial. Each headstone would typically serve two burial plots the inscription giving the names, ages and dates of death of the unrelated dead in the graves.

Pauper’s Grave
A grave for burials where the cost of the burial has been met from public funds. Any common grave would probably contain some paupers as well as some people whose families had managed to pay for the burial, so there is really no such thing as a 'pauper's grave', and the term is never used officially.
----------------
I thought I would add a bit more on stillborn children, and those children who died before baptism, which had been a bit of a “grey” area for the Christian faith. Muslims believe the souls of stillborn babies go straight to Heaven whereas the Christian faith had wrestled with the fate of un-baptised children. Since the 13th century the Roman Catholic answer was limbo, a halfway house between heaven and hell, which whilst not official church doctrine did form part of church teaching This state of “limbus infantium” was only abolished by the Pope in 2006. The Church of England does not believe in limbo and it was vague on what actually happened to stillborn babies. On the other hand Baptists and some other Protestant denominations resisted infant baptism because they believe the souls of babies are innocent.

This confusion has resulted in various anomalies. You find some stillborn babies buried in consecrated ground and some in unconsecrated ground depending on the view of the local priest. There is also evidence that some stillborn babies were christened to allow them to be buried in consecrated ground (look for parish records where the birth, christening and death all occurred on the same day). Likewise some midwives were authorised to baptise children born alive but not expected to live to allow the child to be buried in consecrated ground. If the child survived they were subsequently formally baptised in church resulting in two baptism records.

Thankfully today a more sympathetic attitude is taken and stillborn babies can be buried in consecrated ground
 

Guy

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#6
Burials according to the C of E are in ground consecrated when the graveyard is set up. Some other faiths consecrate the plots individually.
In a public cemetery the section for C of E is consecrated when the section is opened the same as in a churchyard.

From 1880 Suicides were buried in consecrated ground but without the C of E rights being read, if of unsound mind then they were entitled to a full christian burial.

Jay & Guy the info I have comes from the cemetery itself,the plot with the children in is a common grave but the grave with the Quilter adults is freehold ,the first burial was Quintillia in 1863 then the babies in 1864 & 1865, Henry Lee was the first in the other plot in 1876 then Henry Edward in 1915, Jemima in 1918 & William Hanson in 1920, Its possible the family were non conformist but that still doesnt explain why the children are not buried in consecrated ground & the adults are, I always thought that consecration was done at the time of burial but im not certain of that.
Jay, my grandmother committed suicide in 1932 but she is buried in consecrated ground.
Jenn
You seem to be a little confused.
Your first post states the adults were in unconsecrated ground and the infants in consecrated ground.

My 2x great grandmother Jemima Adelaide is buried in the Welford road cemetary
in Leicester with her 1st husband Henry Lee Quilter,her 2nd husband William Hanson & 1 of her sons Henry Edward Quilter, it is unconsecrated ground.

In another plot in the same cemetary is Jemimas step daughter Quintillia Quilter & 2 children who died as babies Walter Horace Quilter age 8 months & Ada Mary Quilter who died at 10 months, there are also 3 other people in this grave that I do not think are connected to the family,this is consecrated ground.

I have no idea why some family are buried in consecrated ground & others in unconsecrated, does anyone have any ideas why.
Jenn
It seems therefore that the reason the adults are in unconsecrated ground could be due to them or perhaps Henry Lee Quilter being unconformist or even athesit.
I would lean towards his wife Jemima Adelaide being C of E and insisting that the children were buried in consecrated ground.
By the time she died her remaining children or perhaps her family wanted her buried with her first husband, though this might simply be because the plot had already been paid for.
Cheers
Guy
 
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