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Court reports

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#1
How easy is it to access court reports for 1814? Would there be prison records? I know that 9 men were charged under the combination act.

I know they went to the local sessions and then to Derby Jail. I know they were discharged but I do not know when the court case came up.

I tried the newspapers and there is very little detail about it.

Basically 9 men were arrested in Norton Derbyshire for combining to seek better wages.

The song about it says they couldn't afford bail so they were sent to Derby Jail for a few weeks till the case was heard. Presumably as there is no further jail sentence mentioned they were acquitted. I know they certainly weren't transported or anything.

The person I know most about is George Richardson who was a scythe smith in Maugheray Norton Derbyshire. He turns up in future census records.
 
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#3
Thanks I've looked at these. One doesn't mention him at all and the other doesn't give any great detail. I have a friend who has looked at the latter in Derbyshire Archives and says there isn't anymore detail there either. She also says Derby Jail was burnt down so no jail records. Presumably this was more than just petty sessions. It was also at the County Court.
 
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#5
Seems my contact thinks they were petty sessions in Norton at the Bagshawe Arms. I have found that Sheffield cutlers who were tried under the Combination Act were all tried at the petty sessions and were all sentenced to 3 months Jail so song is misleading I think. They weren't there on Bail. They had been jailed for 3 months.

If at the Bagshawe arms then it is also likely that one of the magistrates was a Bagshawe. The problem with that is that some Bagshawe records are in Manchester. However I may be in luck as there are also some in Sheffield Archives.

Given that in the same time period about 200 assorted grinders and cutlers in Sheffield were jailed for the same thing why were these 9 picked out to have a song written about them and who wrote the song? Was it perhaps a Norton man?

Is there some music to go with it? Maybe I should look for songwriters and poets in Norton at the time. Did they sing it at Cross Scythes in Norton Lees? Some of the 9 lived there.

If you go on the Sheffield picture website you can get a picture of the Bagshawe Arms and Cross Scythes. The Bagshawe arms hasn't changed much but Cross Scythes was knocked down in the 30s and rebuilt on the same site.
 

leefer

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#6
We are from Sheffield and ol Norton to,
We make big scythes for a shilling or two,
We got arrested and taken to jail,
Were we dined on caviar,pate and Quail:D

Then we back home and sharpened our knives,
And gave a friendly peck to our poor ol wives,
And went back to making the best of Scythes,
And just getting on with our doldrum life's.:rolleyes:
 
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#7
The truth re George Richardson was that he went to jail his wife was 2 months pregnant and when he came back he worked as a Labourer and died in poverty.

One son tried briefly to be a scythesmith and then became a publican. George's wife died in the 1840s and he died in 1856 at the ripe old age of 82. Not the usual story of a trade union martyr.

Possibly because of their previously prosperous life and the fact that they lived in a rural community and had a sympathetic landlord (their landlord was known for his radical beliefs) none of the Norton Nine seemed to die young and some went on to form their own manufacturing business.

From the same roots came William Gill who changed occupation to become a scales presser (ie. he made knife handles from horn, bone etc). He became the voice of the Chartist movement in Sheffield for a short time.
 

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