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Empty buildings.

benny1982

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#1
I think empty buildings especially empty office buildings look peaceful. In Yarmouth there is a 6 storey office block which was built in 1970 and has been empty for a couple of years now but is up for letting. It used to be the tax office and I have been in the building a few times. It stands empty and as you look up at it you can see the vacant corridors, stairways and rooms. It does look peaceful. It used to be such a busy and prominent office building.
 

p.risboy

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#6
A lot of empty buildings are falling into disrepair. I wouldn't be surprised if squatters tried to break into them.
At least they will be used Ben.

Not in the way they are supposed to be though, but used at least.

I think buildings that are left empty for pure speculation, should be compulsory purchased, and put to better use. And if they need demolishing, as most 60's and 70's properties do, then so be it.

Perhaps homes for the squatters would be a better solution.

Steve.:)
 

p.risboy

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#8
I will say Ben, it looks better than what I though it would from the outside.:)

Just caught a bit of a programme on the BBC, called 'Empty Houses'. Another property prog, but it highlighted one property owner in Birmingham.

There was an almost derilect Victorian terrace which the council investigated as to why. It transpired that the owner had 4 other similar properies in the same road and in the same condition, and had been so for a long time.
The Birmingham Council 'bought' these properties from the owner and modernised them and resold them as affordable housing.

Hats off to B'Ham council, and shame on the cad that let them get in that state.
No wonder there is a housing shortage, if people hang on to property to let it rot.:mad: :mad:

Steve.:)
 

benny1982

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#9
Hi

The building I posted a link to is still empty and showing signs of decaying.

Here is another pic.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30243280@N02/4938369568/

Apparently the building is listed for some reason. This means it probably wont be demolished. A fellow user of this website says the plumbing and heating is rubbish and the windows cannot be replaced due to their design.

I bet on dark winter nights this building is freezing. No one has been in it for 2 years now.

Ben
 

ianto73

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#10
There are empty buildings (some as much as 6 years) near where I live and they don't look sad, they look like slums-now who would want to live next door to that? In my past I have been involved in Housing, some local authorities are reluctant to commence compulsory purchase because it is expensive, time-consuming with no guarantee of success. I also knew of a landowner who was prepared to sell a plot on the one condition that it would not be used for social housing. I could wax lyrical about the problems of housing but will not bore you all, I may be Dozy but I am not Daft!!:biggrin:
 

benny1982

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#11
Hi Ian

The building I am talking about may stand empty for some time then. If so it will start to fall down. Cracks are appearing in the windows and you can see a few sagging ceiling tiles. I dont think it will be demolished as it is listed but it will need a lot of expensive work on it if it is reused.

Here is a photo of some of the sagging ceiling tiles.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30243280@N02/4525595783/in/set-72157623289091834/

Ben
 

ianto73

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#12
Listed Buildings are another major problem, here the Civic Society people fought tooth and nail to stop a certain building from being demolished because it was listed (I think) but part of a legacy of the architect who built many properties in the area. You would have needed £250,000 to overcome the decay, rotten timbers etc etc etc and in the end it has now gone because common-sense says no-one but no-one will spend that sort of money on a lost cause.
Pubs are also a problem in that very many have three floors, the top one invariably empty for decades, refurbishment of these properties costs a big chunk of the money we are not supposed to have these days!!
Funny old world!!
Dozy
 

benny1982

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#13
Glad to talk to a person with experience in properties. This building i am on about won an award for its design and has 3 roofs.

If it is listed it probably makes it harder for it to be demolished but I wonder if they could do?

If no one leases it or is interested then the building will just decay even more for years and might have to be pulled down.
 

ianto73

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#14
I don't think the government (any of them) will ever publish the number of empty properties by category in this country - it would highlight a problem none of them seem to want to tackle. On my train journeys into Manchester and London, the number of empty factories/office buildings alone makes me wonder how they are built when there is no potential occupier on the horizon.

Back home in the Rhondda, a small estate of starter factory units was built, mostly 1000 square feet and many were never occupied for over 5 years to my knowledge, as I've said, it's a funny world!!
Apologies folks, my cynicism coming to the fore..........time to call it a day.
Bon Nuit
Dozy
 

benny1982

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#15
There are a lot of empty buildings across London which are falling into disrepair. There is one in Covent Garden near the Travelodge which has been empty for a while and is falling into decay.
 

benny1982

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#17
I think if the buildings have no real historical value, they should ripped down

Who wants a 'monument' to some obscure, concrete mad architect.:confused:

Steve.:)
I take it you have seen the pics of that building I have posted links to? You must have said you say it looks better than you thought it would be when you first saw the link.

I is only 40 years old and has no historical value but the design is wacky.
 

p.risboy

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#18
That's the problem Ben. They design wacky buildings that no one else wants. Then the maintenance of these buildings, makes it prohibitive for any future purchasers.

I think whoever owns these buildings should make them more attractive to purchasers to take over.

No one wants huge buildings these days, that need loads of money spending on them, even before they spend money converting them for their own use or making them usable.

Who cares if the windows are 'quirky', it'll cost extra £1000's just to repair or upgrade them.
If no one wants it....rip it down and make better use of the land it sits on.

In Northampton, where I used to live.....there is a huge concrete tower, where a lift manufacturer used it to test lifts.
It's now out of use, and there is a preservation order on it. WHY I ask.....it's of no use, except to fly flags from.

And who's paying for the maintenance and protection of this eyesore. You are, from your taxes.

The Barclaycard offices in Marefair, Northamton are another classic example.
It was constructed so it could be multi functional over 6 floors.....excellent design and well maintained.
So what happened to this well designed and easily convertable building......they tore it down and put a cinema there.
It was 5 minute walk from the train and bus stations, if that.

It all just baffles me really, as to what wallies make these decisions.


Steve.:)
 

ianto73

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#19
Steve, having played rugby in Wellingborough, I know of the Express Lift Tower and its preservation order - to all those that want to keep these monstrosities I have one simple question, "How much money are you prepared to maintain this building and for how long?" Sadly, as you and many others know, we'll never get an answer.
On a slightly different tack, when Housing Associations first got set up, they were allowed to buy old properties and renovate them as well as build new ones. As far as I am aware some 10 years ago or more the system was changed so that they could no longer buy old properties and that may have to do with the funding they receive from both the private and public sector -- I may be wrong but it's what I remember.
Brian
 

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