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Family stories passed down the generations?

benny1982

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#1
Of course not all of them are true but you wonder how long has such a tale remained in the family? Can it last just 2 or 3 generations or can it be passed down through several?

Such as for example say if someone's nan born in 1920 said "There is some French Huguenot ancestry in the family" and her family was researched, and indeed in the late 1600s, there was some Huguenot ancestors, then I guess it is a story that has passed down 200 years since the event and in that case "where there is smoke there is fire".
 

emeltee

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#2
My paternal grandmother, who died in 1959, always said we had French blood in the family and were descended from a family called Dupont.

Many years later I traced her father's family back to Sunderland where one of his ancestors born c1705 was a Thomas Vipond. The name Vipond is said to be a derivative of the French name Vieuxpont, the name having arrived in England with William the Conquror's army in 1066.

Vieuxpont - Dupont - I'd say that's pretty close. Just wish I could get back to the 1066 link!

Emeltee
 

benny1982

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#3
My nan said that her grandfather born in 1852 in Oxford had some Irish blood. Well James Edgington born 1852 had James Smith born c1790 as his maternal grandfather. James Smith died in 1849 and said he was not born in Oxfordshire in 1841. One of the witnesses to James' wedding was Andrew Carney, who I have found, was a Londoner. Andrew may have been a relative as he worked in the metal making business like James Smith did. Carney is an Irish sounding name. James Smith may have been a cousin of Andrew Carney. Andrew married again in 1842 and said his father was James Carney a cutler. Andrew died in 1845 aged 56 so born c1788/1789 or thereabouts.
 

p.risboy

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#4
My Dad told me, I was a little mongrel. He was right, 100%. :eek:

I was made up of parts, from all over the country of England.....and possibly a sprinkle of Scotland.

From Devon to Norfolk(via Chatham), and mostly Bucks. From Sailors, to Armed Forces, to Farmers and Steam train drivers.

I'm so happy to be a 'mongrel'.:2fun:
 
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DaveHam9

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#5
Ah. 1066. It's said my Furner family from Brede, E Sussex were Fernier who arrived with William the Conqueror.

There is one tree with a Nyckolas in Brede in 1666. Still a long sway to go to get back to 1066.

Anyway, I'm stuck in 1795 with no baptism for my ancestor Charles.


Another story handed down 4 generations has a brother of another ancestor as a minister in a church in Paisley with a plaque on the wall commemorating his 30-years of service. I walked the street of Paisley in 2008 and found no evidence that such a person existed.


Lots of 'mongrels' - My family - Scotland, Ireland, England and Germany.

Dave
 
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benny1982

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#6
There was always some Irish migration to the UK long before the famine of the 1840s. I read that in 1800 there was about 20'000 Irish in London and the population was 1 million.

James Smith could have been a Londoner and his family may have originated in Ireland. The Andrew Carney lead is food for thought and I shall keep digging. I also read that tin plate working was common for gypsy ancestors.
 
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#7
My Gran has always told me I had some Scandinavian ancestry, mixed in with English and Welsh, Scottish, Irish etc.

A Sailor or Captain of sorts he was.

Their surname was 'Johannson' in that spelling variation, but sadly I could never find the exact person himself. Though I did successfully find the Johannson name spelled a lot of different ways. To top it all off the roots of my heritage were dead on and they were from Norway, like gran said. But also Sweden.

After having done a dna test last year.

I have researched enough trying to find this detail in exactness.
But to no avail. Oh well, it might just be a myth of time or just mixed in with everything else I am. Heh.
 
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Ladybird1300

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#8
When I started my research I was expecting and Irish line as my maiden name was Irish Hickey.
I thought there may be a Welsh side with the name Thomas (still not quite there with that one) haven't managed to get out of Buckinghamshire, but copper rolling may be the answer to that when I know where to look.
My mother always said her grandfather was born in Scotland, well she was almost right it was actually her g grandfather although he had an Irish name Hegney.
So at one point I had all my g grandparents marriage certificates and knew who was who except one from my father's side. When it arrived I had a notion I would find more Irish Ancestry, but no to my surprise it lead me to my Huguenot Ancestry.
I had no expectations about my father's side, he died when I was young so imagine my surprise when I received the certificate what exciting news!!
My mother has all the names from 1066 but like evryone else no way of getting there from the 16th century.

Amanda
 

p.risboy

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#9
My Gran has always told me I had some Scandinavian ancestry, mixed in with English and Welsh, Scottish, Irish etc.

A Sailor or Captain of sorts he was.

Their surname was 'Johannson' in that spelling variation, but sadly I could never find the exact person himself. Though I did successfully find the Johannson name spelled a lot of different ways. To top it all off the roots of my heritage were dead on and they were from Norway, like gran said. But also Sweden.

After having done a dna test last year.

I have researched enough trying to find this detail in exactness.
But to no avail. Oh well, it might just be a myth of time or just mixed in with everything else I am. Heh.
If you have English, Irish and Scottish in your tree, you're almost certain of Scandinavian genes.;)

Steve.:)
 

Ladybird1300

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#10
If you have English, Irish and Scottish in your tree, you're almost certain of Scandinavian genes.;)

Steve.:)

That's not always true Steve I took a DNA test and I only have 4% Scandinavian DNA, most of it has disappeared in the last thousand years. My mother doesn't have any and she definitely has Irish ancestors, and possibly Welsh.

Amanda
 

p.risboy

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#11
That's not always true Steve I took a DNA test and I only have 4% Scandinavian DNA, most of it has disappeared in the last thousand years. My mother doesn't have any and she definitely has Irish ancestors, and possibly Welsh.

Amanda
4% is enough to qualify.:2fun::2fun:

From about the 8th century, from just above Liverpool, and cutting down to London and the East, was Viking territory. Cork, Belfast and Dublin were other Viking settlements, and plenty of others around Ireland.

The genes will 'water down' as the centuries move on, and helped by the bloodbath that William 1st was responsible for. Especaily in the Cenrtral and North of parts England.

My surname is Norman French, but does that make me French or Viking.:2fun::2fun:
 

Ladybird1300

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#12
My 4% must come through my father and my Huguenot ancestry, I have ancestors from all over the British Isles but it doesn't look like they qualify.

Amanda
 

benny1982

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#13
There is no such thing as Irish DNA or Scottish DNA so to speak. It is a DNA found in a certain area due to certain waves of immigration. Such as there is no such thing as Scottish blood. It is a figure of speech when you say "Scottish blood".
 

p.risboy

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#14
My 4% must come through my father and my Huguenot ancestry, I have ancestors from all over the British Isles but it doesn't look like they qualify.

Amanda
French Huguenot's, emigrated and settled in Holland, Scotland, England, Denmark, Sweden and Swizerland, not sure when..possibly between the early 17th and 18th century.
I'm not an expert on them really.

And Benny, when someone says they have Scottsh blood (etc). in them, they usualy mean there loyalties are to where they were born. It's a figure of speech I guess.

When I say I'm 'Bucks through and through'....it's only because I was born there, as were all my paternal line.

I also say I'm English, not British. It's where I was born. No such country as Britain.:2fun::2fun:

Strange old world, eh.!!:)


Steve.:)
 

Ladybird1300

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#15
Some of my Huguenots came from Picardie to Spitalfields after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes which was 22nd October 1685, which was known as the Edict of Fontainebleau.
I have found two trees online both of which could be related to me, but one doesn't mention an Isaac Lecerf/DeCherf, the other one does but he was born in Amsterdam which then gives me another problem because he was married in France. I'm hoping that the many border changes make this correct, sooner or later I may have to pay a visit to the Huguenot library in Soho for some help.
I have others who settled here long before that but I don't know where they came from. But the Vanners left a legacy in Sudbury with their Silk mill which is still in operation, sadly it isn't owned by the family anymore.

Amanda
 

benny1982

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#16
Snap as I have Huguenot ancestors. Auber, Fradin, Morin, Pequin and further back the Mainardeaux and Du Baux families from Poitou and Normandy. Many of them emigrated to Spitalfields in late 1600s/early 1700s but Francois Fradin born c1725 moved to London in 1752, one of the last waves of Huguenots but I think he wanted to join rellies in London as he was escaping religious persecution in France.
 

Ladybird1300

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#17
Snap as I have Huguenot ancestors. Auber, Fradin, Morin, Pequin and further back the Mainardeaux and Du Baux families from Poitou and Normandy. Many of them emigrated to Spitalfields in late 1600s/early 1700s but Francois Fradin born c1725 moved to London in 1752, one of the last waves of Huguenots but I think he wanted to join rellies in London as he was escaping religious persecution in France.
If you are on FB may be you would like to join our French Huguenot genealogy group. Lots of chat and one or two people who know a fair bit about them, there may be people with the same names you have.

Amanda
 

benny1982

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#18
If you are on FB may be you would like to join our French Huguenot genealogy group. Lots of chat and one or two people who know a fair bit about them, there may be people with the same names you have.

Amanda
I joined a few weeks ago and love the place. It got me back another generation or 2 on my Du Baux/DuBosc line. Julia Sawalha has DuBosc ancestors from the same village as well. My Matheiu DuBosc born 1594 may have been a brother of her ancestor Jean DuBosc born c1605. I think Jean's son Daniel moved to London, England.

All these exotic names I have in my Huguenot lines.
 

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