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Father's will - illegitimate child

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#1
Dear Family History UK/Wills Forum

We have an illegitimate child in our family born in 1893 possibly to an aristocrat.

The child's birth was registered - using a false father (the mother's own father with a false transport related job, road car timekeeper) - the mother using a false name, that she also used when she later married and also using a false name for her father, again with a false transport related job, as cab proprietor.

The child was baptised outside of his parish - with false 'baptism parents' - which was unusual as if the mother and child required parish relief the child should have been baptised within his own parish - and the parish would also have put pressure on the mother and father to marry - or for the father or father's family to provide financial assistance to the mother and the child so not to put unnecessary financial pressure on the parish - but only enough financial assistance to keep them from the workhouse.

The mother and child did not go to a workhouse, or the child to another family as nurse child while the mother worked, nor did the child go to a baby farm while the mother worked - or was aborted or suffered infanticide.

However, the child was sent to a boarding school aged seven in the 1901 census (we do not know the circumstances of the child's life before this) - and he was also there with his cousin who may also have been illegitimate. The mother is found in the 1901 in a boarding house living on own means - was she receiving a private income - and was the father paying for the child's boarding school fees. Would this have been a one-off payment or a regular payment (and so by providing for the mother and child in this way it would not be necessary to name the mother and child in the father's will)?

The other child at the boarding school (who was cousin to the illegitimate child) may also have been illegitimate but we do not know this for certain - the mother names herself on the birth certificate and her 'husband' (but their marriage cannot be traced) - when the child is baptised with her illegitimate cousin she also has a false 'baptism parents' - both the 'father' on the birth certificate and 'father' on the baptism record have transport related jobs - tram line cleaner and P&O steward.

We believe that both children may be illegitimate - and both with aristocratic parents?

However, could the above transport related jobs have been able to send these children away from London to Southend to a boarding school?

Thank you for any thoughts on this subject!
 

gibbo

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#2
I dont think you are going to find out much unless you have the name of the father. Without his name you cant find a will etc. to obtain for info such as did he make allowances for the child etc.

Do you know what occupation the childs mother had at around the time she fell pregnant? Sometimes a domestic servant had children to the "man of the house" Was there a home address for the mother on the child's birth certificate?
 

Guy

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#3
Dear Family History UK/Wills Forum

We have an illegitimate child in our family born in 1893 possibly to an aristocrat.
More often than not such assumptions prove to be false. Could be for instance landed gentry or one of the nouveau riche industrialists or simply someone well enough off to provide for them.


The child's birth was registered - using a false father (the mother's own father with a false transport related job, road car timekeeper) - the mother using a false name, that she also used when she later married and also using a false name for her father, again with a false transport related job, as cab proprietor.

The child was baptised outside of his parish - with false 'baptism parents' - which was unusual as if the mother and child required parish relief the child should have been baptised within his own parish - and the parish would also have put pressure on the mother and father to marry - or for the father or father's family to provide financial assistance to the mother and the child so not to put unnecessary financial pressure on the parish - but only enough financial assistance to keep them from the workhouse.
If a child was presented for bapitism the vicar was by ecclesiastical law obliged to baptise the child.
If someone was providing for the mother & child the parish often did not get involved.

The mother and child did not go to a workhouse, or the child to another family as nurse child while the mother worked, nor did the child go to a baby farm while the mother worked - or was aborted or suffered infanticide.

However, the child was sent to a boarding school aged seven in the 1901 census (we do not know the circumstances of the child's life before this) - and he was also there with his cousin who may also have been illegitimate. The mother is found in the 1901 in a boarding house living on own means - was she receiving a private income - and was the father paying for the child's boarding school fees. Would this have been a one-off payment or a regular payment (and so by providing for the mother and child in this way it would not be necessary to name the mother and child in the father's will)?

The other child at the boarding school (who was cousin to the illegitimate child) may also have been illegitimate but we do not know this for certain - the mother names herself on the birth certificate and her 'husband' (but their marriage cannot be traced) - when the child is baptised with her illegitimate cousin she also has a false 'baptism parents' - both the 'father' on the birth certificate and 'father' on the baptism record have transport related jobs - tram line cleaner and P&O steward.

We believe that both children may be illegitimate - and both with aristocratic parents?

However, could the above transport related jobs have been able to send these children away from London to Southend to a boarding school?

Thank you for any thoughts on this subject!
Have you tried contacting the school, do they have an archivist. They may have records of who paid the school fees for the child/children.
Cheers
Guy
 

gibbo

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#5
The reason i asked about the mother's address and occupation is that sometimes it can open doors to more info.

My father's birth cert. stated his mother was single and worked as a live in domestic servant and father was left blank. It had her residential address. I figured i would have a dig around and see who else was working at that address at the same time.
No one else was but the married "man of the house" had the same christian name as my father was given. Without going into a long story there is a lot more i found that leads me to believe this fella was my grandfather. Tho without DNA we will never be 100% sure.

Addresses on certs. and hospital records can be rewarding at times.

Hence, who else was at the same address as the mother? Where did the mother work? And did she work for anyone who may have been able to afford sending a child to boarding school? Also was the child born in a hospital? If the records for the hospital have survived there could be information in them also.

Granted my father was born in the 1930's but i managed to find out even how much he weighed at birth! :cool:
 

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