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George Coombs. Any ideas?

benny1982

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#1
Hi

I did post on this before a short while ago and a bit more evidence has come to light.

My 4xgreat grandfather George Coombs and his wife Sarah had their last child William Thomas Coombs baptised at St James, Piccadilly, London on the 4th March 1830. George was a coachman and the family were of 7 Husband Street, Soho.

I have mentioned in my success story on here that Sarah Coombs had her marriage banns to James Bradford read in Marylebone Church July 1834. She was a widow and they (James Bradford and Sarah Bradford) witnessed Sarah's eldest son Matthew George Coombs wedding in July 1835. Sarah Bradford then witnesses Matthews second wedding in July 1845 and registered his first wife's death and one of his sons deaths and is on the 1841 census in Marylebone with her youngest son William aged 12 who is my 3xgreat grandfather. Sarah died in 1851 aged 60 so born about 1791. I am well pleased that the banns record proved I had the right Sarah. July was a favoured month for weddings in that family. Jeez.

This means that George Coombs had to have died in-between 1830 and 1834 if Sarah had her banns read in July 1834. I manually searched all Westminster and Marylebone parishes in 2005 to 2007 and could find no burial of a George Coombs/Coombes/Combes etc that would fit and Westminster and Marylebone seem to be the most obvious areas as Sarah was in Soho in 1830 and Marylebone in 1834.

Now that many London parish records have gone online from the LMA, even though they are not yet fully complete I found the burial of a George Combs in November 1831 at St Pancras Parish church. He was of the workhouse and aged 41.

My George Coombs would have been about that age in 1831 as him and Sarah born about 1791 had Matthew Coombs in 1812. Also it is the right time frame if Sarah had her marriage banns to James Bradford read in 1834. The workhouse records survive for that time for St Pancras and the entries say George Coombs, not Combs like the burial, aged 41. Unfortunately no occupation or address was given.

George Coombs was admitted to the workhouse on 27 Sep 1831 and discharged on 14 October. he was readmitted on the 10th November and died on the 15th November aged 41.

He does not appear in the registers an time before September 1831.

So far this is the only likely candidate for that period and age group in the whole of London. It does look promising. A cousin who is also a good researcher reckons we have him and my mum does.

I have been trying to find him for ages and it looks like I have found a burial. The conjecture is good. He was buried by the workhouse in a paupers grave.

Ben
 

Robesur

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#2
There is no way of proving these things one way or the other, you can only go on the question of probabilities and gut feeling. The workhouses acted as hospitals for the poor so perhaps he had an uncurable illness or had suffered an accident which had permanently crippled him. At least the other members of the family managed to scrape by and avoided being placed in the workhouse. They would however not have been able to find the capital to pay for a funeral as they had lost the main breadwinner, hence a pauper's funeral.
I would say he was very likely your man with one proviso, he was a 'Coachman', what did his job entail? Did he travel regularly outside London, in which case he could have had an accident or taken ill on a trip. died and was buried wherever.
 

benny1982

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#3
If it was after 1837 then I would have been able to prove things even better by a death cert. After 1837 and census records it is easier to prove relationships.

I have proven beyond doubt that his wife Sarah remarried in 1834. I am very certain it is the right man.
 

p.risboy

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#4
Hi Ben,

If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, I think he's your duck.:)

Apart from digging him up, and doing a DNA test, I think he's your man.:)

But Ben, please don't dig him up though, as grave robbing will get you transported.:)

Steve.:)
 

benny1982

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#5
Yes I am certain he is my man. I cannot find any corresponding George Coombs in that area prior to 1830 who were fathering children. There were a few in the East End but I have crossed them out. I would have thought that even if he was taken ill on a trip he would have wanted to return to London due to ill health. It looks like he was ill for a short while before he died, he may have been bought home to his family.
 

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