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Historical Weather Forecasts.

benny1982

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#1
Hi

Tracing weather forecasts can probably help determine why an ancestor died at a certain time of year or how they caught their illness for instance, my ancestor John Auber died in April 1844 of chronic catarrh, 3 months, certified. This means that he was diagnosed in about January 1844, but had probably had a bad cold since about Nov/Dec 1843. If I was to go and check weather forecasts and archives for late 1843/early 1844, this would help determine why he caught the illness, the severe cold or smog.

My great, great, great grandmother died in November 1886 in Holborn, London after 3 sudden but aggressive infections. I found that smog was worst in November time. If I looked at weather forecasts for November 1886, that would also help why and how she caught the initial infection.

Ben
 

p.risboy

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#2
Hi

Tracing weather forecasts can probably help determine why an ancestor died at a certain time of year or how they caught their illness for instance, my ancestor John Auber died in April 1844 of chronic catarrh, 3 months, certified. This means that he was diagnosed in about January 1844, but had probably had a bad cold since about Nov/Dec 1843. If I was to go and check weather forecasts and archives for late 1843/early 1844, this would help determine why he caught the illness, the severe cold or smog.

My great, great, great grandmother died in November 1886 in Holborn, London after 3 sudden but aggressive infections. I found that smog was worst in November time. If I looked at weather forecasts for November 1886, that would also help why and how she caught the initial infection.

Ben
It could also depend on the occupation as well Ben.
The smog factor was at it's worst in London, as you know. But also applies to a lot of the other industrialised towns of the country. And again those poor living conditions.
And also if you were one of the fortunate or unfortunate people who had gas lighting in the house, the pollution from that could also be a factor. Coal gas was not a very environmentally friendly gas, as it was poisonous, whereas natural gas is suffocating.
But the weather could provide valuable clues as to somebody's demise.
Good idea Ben.

Steve.:)
 

benny1982

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#3
Hi Steve

Age could also have played a part. My 3xgreat grandmother lived in central London, in a tenement block where there was no countryside or fresh air within a 4 mile radius, and in the late autumn of 1886 she wasnt able to survive yet another winter in a city of 3 million people. She was only 46 when she died.

As for John Auber, well he was 60 when he died in 1844, and he was a silk weaver of Shoreditch, in the East End. The dust from the fabric or looms may have affected his sinuses and his age may have played a little part.

Ben
 

p.risboy

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#4
Hi Steve

Age could also have played a part. My 3xgreat grandmother lived in central London, in a tenement block where there was no countryside or fresh air within a 4 mile radius, and in the late autumn of 1886 she wasnt able to survive yet another winter in a city of 3 million people. She was only 46 when she died.

As for John Auber, well he was 60 when he died in 1844, and he was a silk weaver of Shoreditch, in the East End. The dust from the fabric or looms may have affected his sinuses and his age may have played a little part.

Ben
Hi Ben,

It really makes you wonder, how anyone survived with all those hazards.

I reckon they would have all been better off in the country living under bushes.

Steve.:)
 

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