• Do you love Genealogy? Why not write for us? we're looking for volunteers to write articles for Family history. Please contact us for further information.

How green was my valley

#1
Just finished watching this wonderful old classic starring Roddy Mcdowell and Donald crisp.

It was about a coal mining town in the Rhondda valley Wales and featured a family called Morgans. It had special relevance for me as my G/ grandmother was a Morgan from Wales.

A real tear jerker it was about this family's trials and tribulations in the early 1800s.

Donald Crisp played a wonderful part and bought real meaning to this wonderful old classic.

Taffy Brian I'm sure you've seen it before but its well worth watching again as you are always talking about the Rhonda valley.

Oz
 

leefer

Loyal Member
Posts
7,107
Likes
2
Location
swindon wilts
#3
http://www.welshcoalmines.co.uk/Photo.htm

Great film....that is.
I visit lots of old pits in South Wales...delivering as many have been transformed into industrial units...indeed last week i delivered to the old pit of Blaenavon.
Have a look at these photos on the link...i love them.go through the list on the left,so many good old photos.
I can honestly say when i visit these places you can smell the hardship and history....in fact there are many a time i will walk around the old buildings and pit workings......the old pit workings are incredibly atmospheric.
 

ianto73

Valued Member
Posts
979
Likes
0
Location
Lancaster
#4
Oz, you are right, of course, boyo, that film has been seen quite a few times over the years, you see, lovely isn't it! Mind you there are those, you see, that think it should have had "Welsh" actors in, because they would have been talking like me, isn't it, lovely boy!! :biggrin::biggrin:

I have a publication from my village - BLAENLLECHAU - which talks about the hardship and history and it's called "GREEN, BLACK AND BACK". I also have some photos of the area, without any sight of the pits, and it really is green now, loads of trees where there were none because they cut them down for use in mining.

Now you have got me yearning to make that trip home Oz, perhaps I'd better go do some busking to pay for it, can't sing a note mind - just like a lot of the X factor hopefuls I suppose.:2fun::2fun:

To be born Welsh is to be born with a song in your heart and passion in your soul!!

Brian
 
#5
Oz, you are right, of course, boyo, that film has been seen quite a few times over the years, you see, lovely isn't it! Mind you there are those, you see, that think it should have had "Welsh" actors in, because they would have been talking like me, isn't it, lovely boy!! :biggrin::biggrin:

I have a publication from my village - BLAENLLECHAU - which talks about the hardship and history and it's called "GREEN, BLACK AND BACK". I also have some photos of the area, without any sight of the pits, and it really is green now, loads of trees where there were none because they cut them down for use in mining.

Now you have got me yearning to make that trip home Oz, perhaps I'd better go do some busking to pay for it, can't sing a note mind - just like a lot of the X factor hopefuls I suppose.:2fun::2fun:

To be born Welsh is to be born with a song in your heart and passion in your soul!!

Brian
Brian, I noticed that the mine owners name was Evans pronounced E-vans,
one of yours?

Oz
 

ianto73

Valued Member
Posts
979
Likes
0
Location
Lancaster
#6
No, boyo, the owners of ours were the Davies's you see, but there again, ours were real pits, you see, and at the bottom of the road where I lived. I do remember the men walking up from the pit covered in the coal dust and they used to stop opposite our house for a break and a fag before walking further up the hill to their homes, you see. Mind you, you see, my grandfather was the "gaffer" underground and was well respected in the village - he had a good policy for those that argued with him or refused to do what he told them to do - two hits, him hitting the bloke and the bloke hitting the ground, quite fair really you see!!:2fun::2fun::2fun:

Taff

ps, I'll translate if you want?
 

p.risboy

Loyal Member
Staff member
Moderator
Posts
17,932
Likes
402
Location
In Ireland, but born Bucks.
#7
No, boyo, the owners of ours were the Davies's you see, but there again, ours were real pits, you see, and at the bottom of the road where I lived. I do remember the men walking up from the pit covered in the coal dust and they used to stop opposite our house for a break and a fag before walking further up the hill to their homes, you see. Mind you, you see, my grandfather was the "gaffer" underground and was well respected in the village - he had a good policy for those that argued with him or refused to do what he told them to do - two hits, him hitting the bloke and the bloke hitting the ground, quite fair really you see!!:2fun::2fun::2fun:

Taff

ps, I'll translate if you want?

TRANSLATION - Grandad was a bully.>:D:2fun::2fun:
 

ianto73

Valued Member
Posts
979
Likes
0
Location
Lancaster
#8
Now, now Steve, you and I both know that in order to be in charge in those days, you had to be able to handle yourself. However, I spoke to some-one who had worked with my grandfather, and he described him as fair and firm, no-one wanted to upset Evan John (his name), but he was the first person to help you if you had problems. These are three bits I was told:-
Sunday morning in the club, if you didn't have a shirt and tie on - you wouldn't get served.
When the brewery put the beer up by the old half-pence, he blocked the entrance to the club telling his fellow workers, "The brewery make enough out of us as it is, so a half hour means they don't get too much more".
When I asked why no-one argued with him or went against him, the answer was, "Well, Evan John would give them the worst job the following day - and no-one wanted that either."
Having said that, apparently, and I've not found the proof of the story, but it was recorded on his obituary, that he was one of the 8 original Welsh Miners that went around the country singing to raise funds for the striking miners.
So I reckon he was probably a nice type of bully!

Brian
 
#9
Now, now Steve, you and I both know that in order to be in charge in those days, you had to be able to handle yourself. However, I spoke to some-one who had worked with my grandfather, and he described him as fair and firm, no-one wanted to upset Evan John (his name), but he was the first person to help you if you had problems. These are three bits I was told:-
Sunday morning in the club, if you didn't have a shirt and tie on - you wouldn't get served.
When the brewery put the beer up by the old half-pence, he blocked the entrance to the club telling his fellow workers, "The brewery make enough out of us as it is, so a half hour means they don't get too much more".
When I asked why no-one argued with him or went against him, the answer was, "Well, Evan John would give them the worst job the following day - and no-one wanted that either."
Having said that, apparently, and I've not found the proof of the story, but it was recorded on his obituary, that he was one of the 8 original Welsh Miners that went around the country singing to raise funds for the striking miners.
So I reckon he was probably a nice type of bully!

Brian
He sounds like a right proper gentleman:)
 

ianto73

Valued Member
Posts
979
Likes
0
Location
Lancaster
#14
As in the film, the mining valleys were well into boxing, but I've always put that down to the same reason why I liked playing rugby - a good way to get rid of tension at the end of the week......................followed by a couple of pints of course.:2fun::2fun:

Brian
 

Similar threads

Top