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In Flanders Fields.

gibbo

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#3
A interesting read

http://www.show.me.uk/site/news/STO521.html

Found this

In Flanders Fields
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.


http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/flanders.htm
 

calliek

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#4
Every Canadian school child learns that poem by heart! It's also been set to music and sung by children's choir at Remberance Day cermonies here.
 

leefer

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#5
Every Canadian school child learns that poem by heart! It's also been set to music and sung by children's choir at Remberance Day cermonies here.
What a nice suprise,didn't know that.

Gibbo when young i read a story that a year after the first battles the fields became full of thousands of poppy's...more than usual and it stuck(in my mind anyway)...the blood red make it a most poignant image.
 

jay

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#6
John McCrae had been working in a field hospital for many hours without a break. When he finally emerged it was to see red poppies blooming in the surrounding fields and he was inspired to write his poem. The place can be visited and is near one of the smallest of the war cemeteries which contains the grave of the youngest casualty ... fifteen years old and that of a soldier who was the recipient of the Victoria Cross.

The battlefields are well worth a visit as is the museum in Ypres.
 

calliek

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#7
This year an organization called Canada Remembers challenged people to use social media to recognize soldiers from the Virtual Memorial Honour Roll for 30 days instead of just Nov 11
http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/collections/virtualmem

I took this on in the form of a daily blog post - choosing one soldier from WW1 for each day and doing a bit of background on them. I'm on Day 20 currently and I can't believe how much I've learned.

The blog is here:

http://therisingvillage.blogspot.ca/

- the stories are sad and beautiful and I wish I had time to do more in depth research- if anyone recognizes these men or has anything to add I'd love to know more!
 

calliek

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#9
Thanks for the suggestion Leefer!
I actually found that forum while searching for one of the soldiers who joined the RAF- he wasn't supplied with a Canadian service number so I had a hard time locating anything about him and that site came up when I googled his name. I only used it as a source, never thought to post there.
 
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ianto73

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#10
With next year being 100 years since the beginning of WWI, a particularly sad story was in my Regimental Journal this year. A young man from my home town had lost his life in 1916. His brothers and sisters had moved away from the valley, and his parents had passed away before the War Memorial had been built in the local park. Consequently, his name had not been included. However, a nephew of his made a visit to the town and noticed the omission, and the young man's name was added to the War Memorial before Remembrance Day 2012. I am continuously amazed at the stories I read.

"AND WHEN YOU GO HOME,
TELL THEM OF US AND SAY,
FOR YOUR TOMORROW,
WE GAVE OUR TODAY".
 

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