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Law requesting dna

gibbo

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Two major companies that research family lineage for fees around $US200 say that over the last two years, they have received law enforcement demands for genetic information stored in their DNA databases.

Ancestry.com and competitor 23andme report a total of five requests from US law agencies for the genetic material of six individuals in their growing databases of hundreds of thousands. Ancestry.com turned over one person’s data for an investigation into the murder and rape of an 18-year-old woman in Idaho Falls, Idaho. 23andme has received four other court orders but persuaded investigators to withdraw the requests.

Full story

http://www.news.com.au/finance/busi...s/news-story/ed2fe5872be32ad11f58361cecf662bd
 

horse

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#2
Not sure of the ethics of this, Gibbo...

It's one thing to be a law-abiding company, but another to fail its clients in divulging personal info...

It has the same ring as the recent iphone request for accessing encrypted info in the US, in terrorist activity.

Whilst it is a dilemma between good and evil, 'big brother' does spring to mind :rolleyes:

Geoff
 

p.risboy

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It's not our choice to decide what are the merits of peoples DNA, regarding the Ancestree DNA database.

But if people are foolish enough to use the Ancestree DNA check, when it is for profit, then those people should never expect 100% privacy of the results, however innocent they maybe, especially in America, where they can 'dream up' laws to access anything, in the interest of 'national security'.

People seem to forget that Ancestree is a commercial business, not a charity.

Many years ago I bought a cert via Ancetree, and discovered it was twice the price compared to the GRO.

If people want to put there information into a private company, then it's a bit of a lottery regarding privacy.
It's enough when certain government files are hacked by outside sources, let alone us relying on a private companies internet security for our 'private' data.

Steve.:)
 

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