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Locating a residence in a village of an ancestor.

benny1982

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#1
I think I may have found where in the street my Walder ancestors lived at in Warninglid, Sussex. I always thought it was the old forge on the east side of the street but a website with old photos said that according to the 1842 Title map a J Walder occupied a house on the west side of the street as the wheelwrights yard and shop was behind a row of 5 cottages right opposite the Half Moon Inn. John died in 1876 and occupied the shop and yard until he died and it was passed on to his son.

My 3xgreat grandmother Mary Ann Walder was born in 1839 in Warninglid. She moved away to London in 1864.
 

ptjw7

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#4
Thanks Guy but it still has very few street names on it!
The street I always have trouble finding is Red Lion Street, Shoreditch which I think disappeared during slum clearance but I think that theres just too many streets for the map scale!

peter
 

benny1982

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#7
Funnily enough the female who was born in Warninglid in 1839 died in a place so far removed from the idyllic setting she grew up in. She died in a inner city London tenement block in 1886. And I found that the block still exists. It was first built in 1882 as tenements, converted to offices in the 1890s and is now a hostel right next to the parish church.

Census records may help but it all depends on how the enumerator toured the village with the census forms.
 

benny1982

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#8
I have London ancestors and I love researching the properties they lived in, I go round the houses, no pun intended, with looking up the property on later or earlier censuses, 1911 census summary books and electoral registers and maps. However as London was always changing, streets were renamed and renumbered a lot, properties demolished and new tenement blocks built. It seems the address my ancestors lived at in 1881 had been demolished to be replaced with a tenement block by 1900.
 
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#9
Afraid not - was between Huntingdon Street and Wellington Street, disappeared during slum clearance, but so few maps show it - took some time to locate it!

peter
Have you seen this map?
http://london1868.com/weller31.htm
select Islington, St Lukes and Clerkenwell.
on map grid select 3 down, 7 across - scroll up to large map - Red Lion St near bottom, left hand side near Farringdon St Stn. It will enlarge again by clicking map

dave
 

benny1982

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#10
Also sometimes it can be hard to track down a residence of London given on a birth certificate if it says "2 Southampton Terrace, Islington". I thought that was a road but it took me ages to locate it and it was part of Southampton Street, and was a row of houses with that name.

Arthur Terrace was a row of houses on the Old ford Road in Bow, yet birth certs of ancestor siblings gave just 3 Arthur Terrace, Bow.
 

benny1982

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#12
Yes that was the case with Southampton Terrace and Arthur Terrace, they weren't streets but a row of houses along a street with a different name.

Upper Southampton Street was the street and the houses was Southampton Terrace. Hitler's bombs saw to the demise of that terrace, I found out that part of Islington had much war damage as did much of London.
 

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