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Looking for historic Buildings today

duckweed

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Sheffield
#1
Husband said why don't we go out and look for old buildings. I think I may have fired some enthusiasm there. I suggested we go and look for some really old buildings at Coal Aston Derbyshire. Its not far and was originally in Norton Parish, now is linked to Dronfield. I'd looked on all websites and saw nothing but found the heart of Coal Aston is full of old buildings and a 15th century Building called Fleur de Luce which is said to be built in 1491.
 
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nainmaddie

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Exeter
#3
Hi Duckweed,

I could move in to that house !!! I like what they have done in the refurbishment.

There must be some tithe maps or suchlike in the local Record office. I cannot believe that you of all people would be satisfied with just the estate agents details !!!!

Maddie
 
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duckweed

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#4
Oh No, this is just an example of how easy it is to find very old buildings still in occupation in the area. I will investigate the house further as the reason I went looking was that Coal Aston is historically linked to Norton Parish. It seems the whole area is so full of historic buildings no one even bothers to comment or write about them.
 

leefer

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swindon wilts
#5
http://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/01/45/06/1450625_1585f643.jpg

Hi Duckweed...a nice house...almost standing proud.
One lovely perk of my job is seeing such places and i am always amazed how diverse and hidden they are...almost like the squirrel of life has hidden them away for us to see at a later date.
The cottage in the above link i love...in the small village of Shalborne near Hungerford.
I saw it as the lane in front leads to a large old farmhouse(Westcourt farm...worth a google) that is now a lovely B/B......the cottage was picture postcard with snow and the tree and hedge was adorned with traditional Xmas lights.
The farm has been traced back a long time and the beams have ARABIC markings from the origanal carpenters...old indeed.
 

duckweed

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#6
Quite lovely.

I remember going out with my husband when he was checking a hiking route for his scouts, and suddenly coming upon a little thatched cottage, which is very strange for a house in South Yorkshire as most old houses have stone slabs on the roof. I wish I'd had the nerve to knock on the door and ask them about it.
 

leefer

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#7
I often knock if time allows.....once ended up sat on the lawn with coffee and crumpets!
The stone houses of the north are often a statement of boldness....like saying this is how much wealth i have/had...the same goes for Bath in the South though the stone is softer on the eye.
 
#8
http://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/01/45/06/1450625_1585f643.jpg

Hi Duckweed...a nice house...almost standing proud.
One lovely perk of my job is seeing such places and i am always amazed how diverse and hidden they are...almost like the squirrel of life has hidden them away for us to see at a later date.
The cottage in the above link i love...in the small village of Shalborne near Hungerford.
I saw it as the lane in front leads to a large old farmhouse(Westcourt farm...worth a google) that is now a lovely B/B......the cottage was picture postcard with snow and the tree and hedge was adorned with traditional Xmas lights.
The farm has been traced back a long time and the beams have ARABIC markings from the origanal carpenters...old indeed.
Hi Lee, i really like the look of those thatched roofs, we don't have anything like them here, are they expensive to replace and how often do they take to rot out?
 

leefer

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#9
A good thatch will last a lifetime......but often depends on weather.
The weather is probably the reason for less thatched buildings in the north of England.....more wet and windy.
A good thatcher will cost you more money but as i said may last a lifetime....think most will be changed every 20-40 years.

All people named Thatcher have the old roofers to thank for there being:)
 
#10
A good thatch will last a lifetime......but often depends on weather.
The weather is probably the reason for less thatched buildings in the north of England.....more wet and windy.
A good thatcher will cost you more money but as i said may last a lifetime....think most will be changed every 20-40 years.

All people named Thatcher have the old roofers to thank for there being:)
Thanks for that Mate:)
 

marie44

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Owensville, Indiana
#11
Husband said why don't we go out and look for old buildings. I think I may have fired some enthusiasm there. I suggested we go and look for some really old buildings at Coal Aston Derbyshire. Its not far and was originally in Norton Parish, now is linked to Dronfield. I'd looked on all websites and saw nothing but found the heart of Coal Aston is full of old buildings and a 15th century Building called Fleur de Luce which is said to be built in 1491.
oh ducky, how splendid!! can you immagine what all that building has seen? if only they had a way to tell us. :) like someone said, "if trees could talk." wow, wouldnt that be great?
marie44
 
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#12
If you are still interested in the Fleur de luce, I may be able to help a little as it was my family home for nearly 50 years until my father died in 2006
 

gaelwyn

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#15
There is a program called 'Escape to the country' which I love watching, as it shows some wonderful old homes. It's mindblowing that 400yr old, and older, houses are still occupied, when modern houses fall apart so quickly :rolleyes:
Of course they are older than our country....would love to see them in person :)
 
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#18
So sorry I have not replied earlier, I did not receive notifications until today..
When did you move in Cra 19n?

My family moved there in 1957. At the time it was 3 cottages 2 onto the main road and 1 behind. The cottages were classed as slum buildings as there was only 1 outside toilet for all the cottages. I think only one had recently been occupied, but all 3 were in a very poor state. My father was only allowed to buy them because he said he intended to return them to one property and would complete any necessary repair., which he did himself. I was born the following year. At the time they had 2 rooms finished and as he had removed the staircase they had to climb upstairs via a ladder. Over the next few years they changed it around to make it into a lovely cozy family home. During our time it was only 3 bedrooms on the first floor. The attic had not been converted as it is today. There was also no staircase to the attic floor as I believe there is now. During the alterations we found little hidden treasures... There was a little cupboard on the landing by the bathroom, in the back we found a child's shoe. It was the size of a toddlers shoe but had a well worn heel and the laces on the front were still tied. The museum estimated it to be about 250 years old (300 now) and because people were much smaller it would have been from a child of about 7 years of age. We also found numerous bits of clay pipes, all used, one with a monkeys head, a bone handled knife, hand made comb etc. We left these treasures with the house where they belonged and I hope they were passed on. My Father renamed it the Fleur de Luce, I think around 1990 and added the plaque to the outside wall I assume is still there today. Before that we lovingly nicknamed it 'Crumbling' Manor '. It had many many years ago been a coaching Inn but whether that was the name then, I cannot say. It was however an Inn of this name around the beginning of the 20th century with a bad reputation. A story of a squabble between friends and subsequent murder is told in a book called Dark after 7. Our house is on the books cover and was drawn from a photo my Dad provided.

I remember Dad saying the original deed had been lost in a fire before our time but there was talk that the house had originally been the Manor house. The cottages built on the side were added a couple of 100 years ago. It was given grade II status in the 1960s. I believe part of it was even a chip shop for a short time.

For our part, it was a warm cozy family home to my parents and my sister. A very outgoing family. The door was always open and the kettle on for the many friends popping in. And party! Boy did we party.
Sadly my Mum died at home in 1996, my Dad survived her by 10 years but when he died in 2006 we sold it. The new owner made many change, many of the structural changes my parents would have approved of but the cozy decor was removed and a modern airy interior was added. It had also been a chocolate box cottage with roses growing up the walls but the new owner removed all these. I do of course have plenty of photos, but I don't know how to add them.

To the new owner, I would say, I hope you have as many happy years there as we did. I was so very very lucky to have grown up in such a lovely home and what ever it's past, I can assure you the ghosts are very friendly. Although I no longer live locally, I will be happy call on you to tell you more of our life there , bring photos, and tell you of local life and it's characters at that time.
 
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