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laxdoc

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Wilmington, North Carolina
#1
William Marrow recived a land grant in what is now mid North Carolina, Allamance County arround 1740 to 1760. He recived grant after the crown took over from the Carolina Company. He could have come into the State via one of the following ports - Wilmington, North Carolina, or Charleston, South Carolina, or Jamestown Virginia. The grant burn in a house fire over 70 years ago, the land deeds make mention of the grant but give no details. I am picking him as a start point. So any help will be great, Thanks in advance.
 

juliejtp

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#2
Hi Laxdoc,

If William Marrow belonged to the militia there is a book called Colonial Soliders of the South 1732-1774. The book is out of print at the moment according to the web site, so have put the link below and see what you think. You might be able to get this from a library.

There is lots of info on N/C have you tried Googling for any info?.

http://www.genealogical.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&ref=1308&item_number=1003
 

laxdoc

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Wilmington, North Carolina
#4
yes and I found an odd site. they are doing dna testing. I found one group
that matchs my Marrow see below

"the Crossroads/Oaks Morrows"
William Morrow and his wife Jane Parks and at least two daughters came from Ireland to PA with his father-in-law John Parks in about 1760, settling in either York or Cumberland Co. (later Franklin Co.). The family removed to Orange Co. NC ca 1767, settling at what became known as the Oaks community in southern Orange Co. A great grandson reported that William came along with his father and several brothers, one of whom (James, by tradition) “settled in the Cross Roads section in the northern part of the same county, Another settled in Mecklenburg Co.. Another went to Georgia”. The Crossroads refers to an area north of the current town of Mebane, Alamance Co., centered culturally and geographically about the Crossroads Presbyterian Church.

Early Crossroads Morrow descendants intermarried with the Scot-Irish Blackwood, Lasley (Lapsley), & Mebane families, as well as Vincent, Cresswell and English Thompson families. The Oaks branch also intermarried with the English Thompson family, as well as the Pickard, Scottish Andrew, and Scotch-Irish Bryan, Gattis & Graves families.

Two descendants* of this group have an identical 25 marker DNA Haplotype. Once the tests are extended to 37 markers and if all 37 markers match, it would mean that the Crossroads/Oaks Morrows all descend from a common progenitor who shared this same Haplotype. This identical match coupled with oral tradition surely confirms that William and James were brothers. This group does not match DNA with nor are they related to any of the other tested and discussed Orange Co. NC groups. They are unique.

Current matching lines are as follows:
William Morrow* ca1731 - 1807, died Orange Co. NC, m ca 1751 Jane Parks in Ulster (More)
James Morrow* ca1740 – aft. 1800, probably in Orange Co., m2. ca 1772 Ann Mebane in Orange Co. (More)
Thomas Morrow ca1745-1830, died KY, m. Rebecca Small (More)

here is the web site

http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Morrow_in_North_Carolina
 

laxdoc

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#6
I check their colection site. They want $175 up to do the test and then a fee to check to see if you are a match. They a number of family names to check against. They check males with the last name. so I wonder how good are their matches.
 
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