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Miners Cottages

gibbo

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#1
It would have been terrible living in one of these cottages back in the 1870's in QLD Australia:( Imagine coming from England and then having to live in them with the summer heat that Australia has:eek: This one is a cottage in Ravenswood in QLD and is 140 years old, not old by any means but still all part of our history. Actually im surprised the iron hasnt rusted out and that it hasnt fallen down:eek:
 
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gibbo

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#3
That old miners cottage still has the old thunder box loo, now that would not have been fun in summer neither:eek: Would have been like a sauna:rolleyes:
I love Ravenswood, been there quiet a few times just to have a look around and hubby has some family buried up there as well. Some of his family also worked at the mines there in the late 1890's. Its only a hours drive from where i am so it makes a nice outing for a day.
 
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#5
It would have been terrible living in one of these cottages back in the 1870's in QLD Australia:( Imagine coming from England and then having to live in them with the summer heat that Australia has:eek: This one is a cottage in Ravenswood in QLD and is 140 years old, not old by any means but still all part of our history. Actually im surprised the iron hasnt rusted out and that it hasnt fallen down:eek:
Just what i wanted for my retirement years.

Oz
 

ianto73

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#6
I suppose the rented house I was born and brought up in the Rhondda Valley in South Wales could be classed as a miners cottage. No light up stairs, open hearth fire, water tap outside as was the toilet, the coal that we used had to be taken through the house to the back - we had no back entrance to the property. By the time I was nine years of age, I was an expert at chopping wood for sticks and lighting a fire - especially in the winter months.
That's what "Miners Cottages" reminded me of, thanks folks.
 

gibbo

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#7
Anyone heard of a donkey for making hot water? ianto just reminded me that my husband said he used to chop wood as a kid for the donkey. I must have lived a good life cause when he told me this many years ago i had no idea what he was talking about and i was thinking what why would a donkey want woodredf) :rolleyes: After he stopped laughing he then explained it to me.
 

leefer

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#8
Nice pic Gibbo....looks very basic.
My late mother in law came back to England because of the housing...that was in the early sixties...in the Gawler area.
She couldnt understand how the woman coped in those days...to me there is an American look to those early days...the goldminers huts etc.
Regards to you all.
 

gibbo

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#9
Nice pic Gibbo....looks very basic.
My late mother in law came back to England because of the housing...that was in the early sixties...in the Gawler area.
She couldnt understand how the woman coped in those days...to me there is an American look to those early days...the goldminers huts etc.
Regards to you all.
Hi Lee,
The miner's cottages where i live are made from wood and are a couple of foot off the ground on stumps. At least they would be cooler than the ones made from sheets of iron.
Why is it that these hard working people lived in cottages like that but yet the pubs were built beautifully:confused:
 
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gibbo

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#11
Good point Gibbo.
The heat of Aussie or the freezing conditions of England....you decide!
Took me about 10 seconds to decide:rolleyes: I dont like the cold:eek:
It would have been a big change to them tho from England cold to the heat here, supose they would have climatised after a while but still it would have been a shock to them for a bit.
 

leefer

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#12
As of today even Gibbo alot would depend on how much money you had/have.
I mean if you are wrapped up in big coats and can sit by a massive fire after eating your fill on roast beef and pudding then you have a stroll through the winter wonderland of England,coming home to a stiff brandy and a hot toddy life must have been idylic.....alas many didnt have any of that so the winter wonderland wasnt quite so idylic....and the reverse was probably true in the heat of Australia for those early settlers.
 

Ellie

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#13
An intersting photo Gibbo. It would be a bit of a shock temperature wise living in one of those.. I'm amazed as you say it hasn't deteriorated more given its age.
 

gibbo

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#14
An intersting photo Gibbo. It would be a bit of a shock temperature wise living in one of those.. I'm amazed as you say it hasn't deteriorated more given its age.
Hi Ellie,
Dont know how they made their sheets of iron out of back then but they seemed to last longer than they do today. Wonder what the people who lived in it would think if they knew it was still standing.
 

ianto73

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#15
Gibbo, the people who lived in those cottages WOULD NOT understand today's world, because they had to eke out a living the best way they could, with absolute limited financial resources, but I believe they would be just like my grandparents, and got on with living and doing their best for their children.
Within my village the 1881 census return showed large families, some with one or two lodgers living in what used to be known as a "2 Up and 2 Down" house. Isn't history wonderful?:2fun: :2fun:
 

Ellie

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Hi Ellie,
Dont know how they made their sheets of iron out of back then but they seemed to last longer than they do today. Wonder what the people who lived in it would think if they knew it was still standing.
Probably surprised more than anything I would think
 
#17
It would have been terrible living in one of these cottages back in the 1870's in QLD Australia:( Imagine coming from England and then having to live in them with the summer heat that Australia has:eek: This one is a cottage in Ravenswood in QLD and is 140 years old, not old by any means but still all part of our history. Actually im surprised the iron hasnt rusted out and that it hasnt fallen down:eek:
Conditions in early Australia were very basic,it's only been in the last 40 years that people have access to good quality homes.

Family member was telling me that during the depression years his older brother converted the chook shed in their parents backyard and raised 5 tin lids for quite a few years in it.

Wouldn't want another depression if that's how tough things were.

Oz
 

benny1982

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#18
My 3xgreat grandfather lived in a mining village in Pennsylvania in later life. I would have thought the cottage would have been a typical timber framed American house although he was living with his son in law who was a stationary enginner.
 
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