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Money from overseas 1840 era

gibbo

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#1
Ok i have had some info about one of my lot i have been looking for in Australia.
Family word is that "he used to recieve money from overseas"
When talking about the 1840 onward era how would this have been done?:confused: By mail and be sent over on the ships?:confused:

And why would he have recieved money from overseas:confused: maybe family wanting him to stay away:eek:
 

gibbo

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#3
Hi Gibbo

I would go with your suggestion that the money was mailed over my ship.

Ben

Hi Ben,
And no record of it for me to trace. Pity or it could have given me something on William to follow up. It was interesting to hear about the money tho, but doesnt help any with searching for him. Does make me wonder if the story is right why he would have been receiving money from overseas.
 
#5
Ok i have had some info about one of my lot i have been looking for in Australia.
Family word is that "he used to recieve money from overseas"
When talking about the 1840 onward era how would this have been done?:confused: By mail and be sent over on the ships?:confused:

And why would he have recieved money from overseas:confused: maybe family wanting him to stay away:eek:
OK Gibbo, Here's the drum, Usually they were called remittance men.

Usually they were black sheep sons of well to do family's that had had enough of their son's wayward behaviour for drinking, gambling, womanising and general bad behaviour, that had brought disrepute on the family's good name and character.

They were disinherited from the family, sent on a one ticket to Australia with a lump sum of cash, they had to use it to set up their new life. They were also told to never return as there would be no further financial help or recognition from the family.

Oz
 

leefer

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#6
OK Gibbo, Here's the drum, Usually they were called remittance men.

Usually they were black sheep sons of well to do family's that had had enough of their son's wayward behaviour for drinking, gambling, womanising and general bad behaviour, that had brought disrepute on the family's good name and character.

They were disinherited from the family, sent on a one ticket to Australia with a lump sum of cash, they had to use it to set up their new life. They were also told to never return as there would be no further financial help or recognition from the family.

Oz
Very interesting.
And there was me thinking they sent it over by carrier pidgeon:biggrin:
 

gibbo

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#8
I like Brian's suggestion of a legacy etc but with the history of some of them out of this family i think it would be more in line with what oz has said. But then you never know. The story might have no bearing to it neither.
 

DaveHam9

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#15
By ship would be the only way in 1840s and 1850s. Before the time of the telegraph and Western Union. :)

My great grandfather was a remittance man - passage paid by his sister's spouse's father. He worked for his uncle in Gladstone as a compositor at the newspaper.
 
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gibbo

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#16
By ship would be the only way in 1840s and 1850s. Before the time of the telegraph and Western Union. :)

My great grandfather was a remittance man - passage paid by his sister's spouse. He worked for his brother-in-law in Gladstone as a compositor at the newspaper.

Is there anyway for me to find out if William was a remittance man? Or i just have to find him and with what info i get will lead me to knowing if he was or not?
 

DaveHam9

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#17
Hello gibbo,

I'd say being so early on it's going to be very difficult. Much easier in the case of my ancestor who arrived at Cooktown in 1882 with shipping records at that time more complete.

Regards,

Dave
 
#19
Thanks Dave. Would just be my luck that i got a "maybe" lead and cant do anything with it:2fun::2fun:
Gibbo, that sort of info is usually kept secret within the family.

There were no records kept for that sort of thing.

The fare was usually just paid by his parents, some extra cash given for a stake and told never come back to England as they would never be welcome.


Oz
 

gibbo

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#20
Gibbo, that sort of info is usually kept secret within the family.

There were no records kept for that sort of thing.

The fare was usually just paid by his parents, some extra cash given for a stake and told never come back to England as they would never be welcome.


Oz

Thanks oz. Even tho it dont help me with finding this fella it has been interesting finding out about this stuff.
 

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