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Murder of Thomas Arnfield Pagdin

Location
Sheffield
From
England
I don't know if anyone has acess to more info on this. Thomas an alleged wife beater was murdered by his supposed wife Charlotte on the 20th Nov 1870 at their home 19 Suffolk Lane Sheffield. She had married him bigamously as she was already married to Thomas Barton. Her maiden name was Teasdale. She was sent to Broadmoor the asylumn for the criminally insane and is to be found out again in 1891 living as a laundress in Sheffield. Has anyone access to the newspaper report? I believe it was reported in the Times or the court report?
 
I don't know if anyone has acess to more info on this. Thomas an alleged wife beater was murdered by his supposed wife Charlotte on the 20th Nov 1870 at their home 19 Suffolk Lane Sheffield. She had married him bigamously as she was already married to Thomas Barton. Her maiden name was Teasdale. She was sent to Broadmoor the asylumn for the criminally insane and is to be found out again in 1891 living as a laundress in Sheffield. Has anyone access to the newspaper report? I believe it was reported in the Times or the court report?

Hi Duckweed
I found it but it would let me go "into" it, you have to subscribe but you can see part of the article, enough to know its the one your looking for. Part of his name, Sheffield and murder and the name and date of paper.

The Times dated Dec 6 1870

gibbo
 
I don't know if anyone has acess to more info on this. Thomas an alleged wife beater was murdered by his supposed wife Charlotte on the 20th Nov 1870 at their home 19 Suffolk Lane Sheffield. She had married him bigamously as she was already married to Thomas Barton. Her maiden name was Teasdale. She was sent to Broadmoor the asylumn for the criminally insane and is to be found out again in 1891 living as a laundress in Sheffield. Has anyone access to the newspaper report? I believe it was reported in the Times or the court report?

Hi Duckweed

The Times, Tuesday, Dec 06, 1870; pg. 10; Issue 26926; col E
Winter Assizes. Midland Circuit., Leeds, Dec. 5.


Charlotte Barton was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Armfield Pagdin, at Sheffield, on the 29th of November last. Mr. Vernon Blackburn and Mr. Barker appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Hannay defended the prisoner. The prisoner, who is 48 years of age, has been married 23 years, but 12 years ago she separated from her husband, who is still living. Ten years ago she had gone through the ceremony of marriage with Pagdin. Two years ago Pagdin had had a paralytic stroke, and had become feable and unable to work. He was alive on Tuesday, the 29th of November, and on the Wednesday morning, at 10 o’clock, the prisoner went to her daughter’s house and said she had hit Pagdin with a hammer and he was dead. Her daughter and son-in-law did not believe her story, and she went away.
She returned at 12 o’clock. She was asked what she had killed him with, and she said a small hammer. She also went to her brother’s house and told him what she had done, and that Pagdin was on the cellar steps. Her brother did not believe her story, and took her to another sister’s and then to the workhouse. At the workhouse they refused to receive her as a lunatic without a medical certificate, and she was then taken to the police-office. The police, of course, went to Pagdin’s house, and found him lying dead upon the cellar steps, with five wounds upon his head. There was a small hammer on a shelf in the cellar, and a hatchet with a spot of blood upon it behind the kitchen door. Stains had evidently been washed out on the floor of the kitchen, and on the cellar steps. The prisoner, on being asked by her daughter what she killed Pagdin for, replied that “he had asked her to go whoring, and that he had willed away the little bit of money he had to somebody else.” Pagdin had four children. The details of the case will appear from the evidence of the witnesses. The trial turned upon the state of mind of the prisoner at the time of committing the act.
Sarah Ann Copley is the daughter of the prisoner, and lives a short distance from the prisoner’s house. On the morning of Wednesday, about 10 o’clock, the prisoner came in. She seemed in a very excited state. She said Pagdin was dead; she hit him with a hammer. Witness said “What for?” She said, “he wanted her to go a whoring. He had a little money, and he told her he had left it to somebody else.” Pagdin and she had not been living very comfortably latterly. She seemed very queer when she came to the house. She often seemed very low, and when spoken to her she had very little to say. She was very much excited when she came. She frightened the witness so much that she fainted. Witness did not believe her story to be true, and so did nothing.
Thomas John Copley, the husband of the last witness, said he was upstairs when the prisoner came, and he went down to her. She said, “It was an awful sight,” several times, but said nothing more. She stamped, and seemed as if she was right mad, and pulled her hair. The second time she came in she was much excited, and said, “what am I to do, what am I to do?” She had gone about the streets in a bewildered way these two years. The witness had heard it said that the first husband had behaved like a villain, and had ill-used the prisoner.
Morris Teasdale, the brother of the prisoner, stated that the prisoner came to his shop about 2 o’clock. She seemed by the appearance of her to have lost her reason. She then told him what had happened, and he took her to the workhouse and to the police-station, as before stated. The witness told the policeman she had lost her reason, she had said she had killed Pagdin. The constable asked where he lived, and the prisoner replied “19, Suffolk-street,” and handed the key of the house to the policeman. This witness also described the prisoner’s manner as having been strange for the last two years.
Joseph Ashforth, the police-constable, found the body of Pagdin on the cellar steps, his head on the fourth step and his right foot nearly touching his face, his left foot hanging over the side of the steps. There were blood stains outside the door of the house. Inside the floor was partially washed. There were stains on the top step of the cellar and on the door. The bottom step had been washed, and so had the cellar floor. There was a bowl of bloody water in the cellar, a clean wet floorcloth, and a mop. A hatchet hung by a wet string behind the kitchen door in its usual place, and had a spot of blood on it. The hammer was on a shelf above the cellar steps, where anyone could see it. In the cellar a blackbird was found shut up in a small square box.
Mr. Woolhouse, the surgeon, found a large bruise over the left eye, and seven or eight wounds on the scalp, above and behind the left ear, which had gone down to the bone. The bone was driven into the brain. This was the cause of death. Life had been then extinct about 24 hours. This was about half-past 4 o’clock. Either the hatchet or the hammer might have caused the injuries. Mr. Woolhouse gave no evidence of the state of mind of the prisoner, not having sufficient opportunity of observing her.
For the defence, three women, neighbours of the prisoner, were called. They had noticed the change which had occurred in the prisoner during the last two years. They noticed strange looks, and could get no proper answers.
Mrs. Wheelhouse saw her on the 15th of April sitting on some timber in the street, with a shawl round her head, rocking herself to and fro. The witness asked her what she was doing, and she said she was watching the people walking up and down. Witness said to her, “Come and have a walk, you are getting quite in a low way?” The prisoner said, “No, I won’t; I shall do here.”
Martha Ann Robey saw the prisoner, in the summer, in the garden, seated under a pear tree, and asked her what she was doing. She said, “I have been watching the onions grow, and the sparrows fly about and build their nests.” One very hot day she came to witness’s house with a large, thick shawl on, and no shoes, but pattens on. She seemed very sad, as if she was full of trouble.
Ann Smith stated that on the Tuesday in question the prisoner was cleaning the door-step. She did not answer at first, but then rose up and said, Oh dear! Oh dear! My head is so bad this morning, and it’s such a queer head-ache. It fairly affects my eyes.” Witness said, “Your eyes do look queer.” They looked heavy. Witness said, “How is Mr. Pagdin?” and she replied, “He’s no better, but I think he still gets weaker. I think I shall make haste and clean up and go to bed after dinner.”
Mr. John Jackson, the chief constable, stated that he saw the prisoner on the Wednesday afternoon about half-past 4 o’clock. She was in a state of nervous excitement, and could not remain still. There was a desk in front of her upon which she was beating with her hands. Her brother and sister held her hands still, and she then made a similar movement with her feet. She had an idiotic stare, and was staring straight before her all the time. The witness had held his office 22 years. Prisoners are more or less nervous in all cases, but he thought this case so peculiar that he would not allow any questions to be asked of the prisoner, and directed that the surgeon should see her directly.
Mr. Woolhouse, the surgeon, recalled, in answer to the learned Judge, stated that women at the age of the prisoner were liable to be subject to hallucinations.
The learned JUDGE directed the jury that the question for them was, what was the state of the prisoner’s mind at the time? Was she criminally responsible for her act? It would not be enough that she acted from some uncontrollable impulse; but before they could acquit her they must believe that she did not know what she was doing or did not know that it was wrong. He thought they would repose with more security on the evidence given for the prosecution both for and against the prisoner than on that for the defence. First they would ask whether there were any circumstances to account for the insanity. The first husband, it was stated, had acted like a villain to her. Pagdin had had one or two strokes of paralysis. How was she to live? There were four children. Pagdin was going to leave the money away from her and had made a disgraceful proposition to her. His Lordship then went through the whole of the evidence, commenting on it, and concluded. There was an accumulation of misfortunes resting upon her. The motive was a very cloudy motive if any. She had been low, queer and bewildered for a long time before. They would consider her manner at the time of the act and the conduct of her friends in taking her at once to the asylum.
The jury, after an absence of about two hours and a half, returned into court with a verdict of Not Guilty, on the ground of unsoundness of mind.
The prisoner was ordered to be detained during Her Majesty’s pleasure.
...........................................................................................

The murder of Thomas PAGDIN was also mentioned in these newspapers.

Manchester Times (Manchester, England), Saturday, December 3, 1870; Issue 679.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Tuesday, December 6, 1870; Issue 10188.

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Tuesday, December 6, 1870; Issue 9650.

The Illustrated Police News etc (London, England), Saturday, December 10, 1870; Issue 355.

Manchester Times (Manchester, England), Saturday, December 10, 1870; Issue 680.

Reynolds's Newspaper (London, England), Sunday, December 11, 1870; Issue 1061.

Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper (London, England), Sunday, December 11, 1870; Issue 1464.


cheers
crankypants
 
Morning Crankpants
Please, if you dont mind me asking but how did you do that with the newspaper article? I would love to be able to do that.

gibbo
 
Morning Crankpants
Please, if you dont mind me asking but how did you do that with the newspaper article? I would love to be able to do that.

gibbo

Hi Gibbo

To get access to the likes of Times Digital Archive (1785-1985) and British Newspapers 1600-1900 just apply for a library card through the National Library of Australia. This is only available to Australian Residents.

The best thing is it's "FREE" to apply and "FREE" to gain access to there eResources. Just go to link and toggle down page to GET A LIBRARY CARD
Fill in your personal details and they then post out your own library card which has a User ID and family name to use when you log onto site.

http://www.nla.gov.au/

This link shows all there (free, licenced and onsite sources)

http://www.nla.gov.au/app/eresources/index//

Another newspaper source you may already know about which is free, follow link. You can correct articles here yourself.

http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/home

Extremely well worth applying for card. Libraries in your area would also have access to these sources if you prefer to go into library.

cheers
crankypants
 
Hi Gibbo

To get access to the likes of Times Digital Archive (1785-1985) and British Newspapers 1600-1900 just apply for a library card through the National Library of Australia. This is only available to Australian Residents.

The best thing is it's "FREE" to apply and "FREE" to gain access to there eResources. Just go to link and toggle down page to GET A LIBRARY CARD
Fill in your personal details and they then post out your own library card which has a User ID and family name to use when you log onto site.

http://www.nla.gov.au/

This link shows all there (free, licenced and onsite sources)

http://www.nla.gov.au/app/eresources/index//

Another newspaper source you may already know about which is free, follow link. You can correct articles here yourself.

http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/home

Extremely well worth applying for card. Libraries in your area would also have access to these sources if you prefer to go into library.

cheers
crankypants

Hi there,
Many thanks for that. I will do that today and get it sorted. I love old newspapers and for now the state library have been very helpful and very patient with me but it takes a few weeks for any info to get back to me and a lot of it i could do my myself from newspapers.
Thank again

gibbo
 
That is fantastic. The bits of the story I got were that she had been an abused wife but that appears to be her first husband not her 2nd. She appears to be a distant cousin to my husband. That's the 2nd relative of his that attacked their partner. There was another Teasdale that shot his wife. She survived and he got religion.
 
WOW what a great story! And also a great resource, it's much easier and faster to do your own searching, so I'll be joining up too!

Much juicier story than my boring lot!

Jill
 
WOW what a great story! And also a great resource, it's much easier and faster to do your own searching, so I'll be joining up too!

Much juicier story than my boring lot!

Jill

Hi Jill

No what you mean my lot are boring as bat droppings (kept it clean).

Everyone else seems to have very colourful characters in their tree. I don't even own a convict:rolleyes:

cheers
crankypants
 
These are my husbands ancestors but not direct line, they are cousins. My fathers ancestors were a fairly disreputable lot but not quite as eccentric.
 
I am just writing this story for my Bloody Yorkshire series poor Charlotte-she was at the end of her tether it seems.
 
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