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Originals of historical documents.

benny1982

0
Staff member
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Location
Norwich
From
England
I know how good it is to view the originals of them but the more people do that even wearing gloves, it could be wearing away the documents though. Not all Record Office archives are microfilmed or microfiched and you have to view the originals but as said that can cause gradual wear and tear on them. Although if they put them online or on microfilm or microfiche they can be stored away safely for preservation.
 
I know how good it is to view the originals of them but the more people do that even wearing gloves, it could be wearing away the documents though. Not all Record Office archives are microfilmed or microfiched and you have to view the originals but as said that can cause gradual wear and tear on them. Although if they put them online or on microfilm or microfiche they can be stored away safely for preservation.

Hi All

Even better on Disc Ben, then those of us who cannot travel can find our Ancesters.

Gwen :)
 
Just imagine how many pages of the various census have been scanned and copied alone.
Those records would have been through thousands of hands and mucky fingers.
Our Gt. grandkids will find it all so much easier. And they will wonder, how on earth did they/we cope in the 21st century.:)

Steve.:)
 
This argument has been raging since records were first created.
Paper does not last as long as papyrus. ;)

Seriously though, in some circumstances wearing cotton gloves may do more damage to fragile documents than grease from researchers hands.
Gloves cause the user to be more clumsy and heavy handed than when handling the same book/document without gloves.

CDs are not archival material as the data can be changed without leaving evidence of change, cannot be read without correct equipment, may have limited life.
The benefit of CDs comes in disseminating the information quickly and cheaply without having to undertake long print runs.

The best answer is to scan all archives then microfilm the scans (this gives better quality microfilm).
Use the digital scans for present access, the microfilms for long term access and the original document as the untouched backup.
Cheers
Guy
 
Recently I went to view a tiny insignificant document that Rotherham archives had no idea why they had it. It would only be significant to researchers researching the man who sent the bill or the man who received the bill. I think it is unlikely anyone would think it worth scanning in the image and at present a scann is not equal to seeing it in its original form. I said to the archivist I was nervous of touching it as it was so fragile and she put a piece of perspex over it so I did not actually touch it. It was a strange feeling seeing the handwriting of an ancestor who lived 270 years ago. I understand that too much handling could damage documents but I think most documents that would be handled a lot have been copied one way or another. I am always greatful to the local history societies that have painstakingly transcribed and crossreferenced so many records but the trouble with transcriptions is that they rely on the transcriber correctly interpreting the handwriting. I look forward to all parish records being clearly scanned as the microfilm copies at various archives was done years ago and are so difficult to read I sometimes have to ask to see the original.
 
Personally i prefer to look at the real thing...i love history and the thaught of touching and feeling as well as seing something centuries old...of course some items you cant as they are to fragile but like most of things of the past they were built or put together to last the test of time...unlike todays throwaway society.
 
leefer
I know how you feel. I just saw the results of conserveance(sp) . Went to Charleston ,S.C. and saw the US civil war sub the C.S.S. Hunley and how they are saving it.
What blew me a way was two match sticks(used). They were found under the candle used to light the sub in mud. So just think - droped has having no more use, then covered by mud for over 130 years, found and then conserved so they look as just droped. They are saving all kinds of objects. With help from all over. They are finding new ways of saving. No one has tried to save cloths that have been under water for 130 years. Near the candle they have found pencils. They are looking for the pad of paper.
Charles
 
I know how good it is to view the originals of them but the more people do that even wearing gloves, it could be wearing away the documents though. Not all Record Office archives are microfilmed or microfiched and you have to view the originals but as said that can cause gradual wear and tear on them. Although if they put them online or on microfilm or microfiche they can be stored away safely for preservation.

I totally agree,
that is why we all must make sure we leave a record of our research for future generations , that way we are doing our bit to conserve those valuable documents for posterity, and also save our future generations the frustration of what we have been frustrated with , i personally am copying my research as i go along for my grandchildren
regards sterico
 
leefer
I know how you feel. I just saw the results of conserveance(sp) . Went to Charleston ,S.C. and saw the US civil war sub the C.S.S. Hunley and how they are saving it.
What blew me a way was two match sticks(used). They were found under the candle used to light the sub in mud. So just think - droped has having no more use, then covered by mud for over 130 years, found and then conserved so they look as just droped. They are saving all kinds of objects. With help from all over. They are finding new ways of saving. No one has tried to save cloths that have been under water for 130 years. Near the candle they have found pencils. They are looking for the pad of paper.
Charles

Good that Laxdoc....the Mary Rose has items that are unreal...obviously not paper but theyve got some great old items that went down with this ship...particularly like the nit comb with original nits stuck to it!
 
Also I see bits of paper flaking off when I view originals and some finger marks and pages falling out when I have looked at historical records.
 
I can't say I have seen any obvious damage other than damage due to poor storage before the archive got them and those documents were only available on microfilm as our archive will not bring out delicate documents if they were liable to damage. The land registry archive in Wakefield has to show the original documents by law but has restored thousands of volumes so they are not liable to damage.
 
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