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Radical women in Sheffield a possible story?

duckweed

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#1
Hard to firm up the facts but the story reads like this I think though still missing hard facts to directly link Catherine Ash to James Ash.

In 1838 Leeds founded the first Female Radical Association. In 1839 Mrs. Catherine Ash did the same in Sheffield. Her husband James Ash, a joiner and builder contractor was later to become secretary for Sheffield Chartists. They lived for a few years in Randall Street in Neverthorpe. His company later becoming Ash and Son, then Ash Son and Biggin and the company moved to Tudor Square.

The women essentially chartists seemed to have been a large contingent and very active with a lot of chartist and radical speakers coming to speak at their meetings. The hall in Figtree Lane was quite small for such a large group, and the women often found the heat oppressive.

Over the years the other Female Radical groups faded but Sheffield's remained strong and vocal aided by a Radical preacher and Councillor Isaac Ironside who put their views across for them at Council Meetings. In 1851 Anne Knight, a Quaker and campaigner for Abolition of Slavery heard that the womens group were reforming as a political association. Ann who had got fed up of not having a voice at abolitionist meetings had written a pamphlet on women's suffrage, thought these women might be the people she needed to help her. She contacted Isaac Ironside and asked for contact details and was given Eliza Rook's name. Ann Knight suggested that instead of just being a voice through Ironside they needed to think bigger and think nationally and hopefully gather together the remnants of the radical women's groups across the country to petition parliament. Ann's success as an abolitionist campaigner meant she had useful contacts and experience at mounting nationwide campaigns. The women accepted her offer to work with them. Catherine Ash became president of the new Women's Rights Association soon to become the National Women's Right Association.

James Ash Son and Biggin thrived.

However as yet I can find no details of Catherine and James as man and wife, no marriage certificate, no census record, no children. No burial records for either.

Can anyone find any firm evidence to link the 2 together and find me details of their place of birth and when they were born etc. ?
 

DaveHam9

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#4
Searching using all sorts of phrases and still finding nothing that helps, duckweed.

I keep getting Anne Kent and Anne Knight.

Also searching for 'catherine' - Bramby and Barmby in the same document.

http://womhist.alexanderstreet.com/awrm/intro.htm

An outpouring of feminist writings accompanied the growth of radical social and religious movements in Britain and Europe in the 1840s. Catherine Barmby’s "Demand for the Emancipation of Woman, Politically and Socially" (1843) led the way. Under the pen name "Kate" in 1835, Catherine Watkins (1817?-1853) began writing articles for the Owenite newspaper, New Moral World. In 1841 she married Goodwyn Barmby, a leader in the Chartist movement, which in the 1830s and 40s championed the political and economic rights of working people through "the People’s Charter."
Dave
 

juliejtp

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#5
John Biggin who died in 1917 was the Managing Director of Ash Son and Biggin,
Millhouses. He died 14 Feb 1917 as per the Sheffield Libaries and Archives. This I found online.
 
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duckweed

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#6
I am now getting 2 possibles for James Ash though one is doubtful. The one at Randal Street may be the wrong one as says manufacturer later on. That James Ash I think made pen knives and was born in Sheffield in 1820.

I can't understand how Catherine is not showing up anywhere. I know she was in the city at least from 1839-1851 so should be in a census record somewhere. but nothing shows up in the 1841.
 

emeltee

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#7
I can find absolutely nothing on Catherine Ash in Sheffield. Where did you get the information that she set up the Female Radical Association in Sheffield?

Emeltee
 

juliejtp

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Mrs C Ash president pro tem. She was part of the council that attended the Sheffield Female Political Association on 26 Feb 1851 at the Democratic Temperance Hotel, 33 Queen Street Sheffield. Still cant find her on any census.
 

emeltee

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#11
Fmp has the facility whereby you can enter the name of a person plus the name of a member of the household and it will search every years Census for that person and display the results. I have tried James Ash/Ashe with Kate/Catherine
and vice versa and looked at every entry where they would have been old enough to have been a married couple in 1841 and there aren't any James and Catherine Ash anywhere. They do not appear in any Census at all never mind just 1841. I appreciate that there are missing and damaged pages for every Census but who would be that unlucky to have their entry missing or damaged for every year. I hope someone can prove me wrong.

Emeltee
 

emeltee

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#13
The GRO site has two birth refs (could be more but I haven't checked any further)

Charles Ash Jun 1839 Sheffield 22 572 mmn Mitchell
Frederic Ash Jun 1841 Ecclesall Bierlow 22 124 mmn Mitchell

and guess what - they don't appear on any Censuses either - coincidence?

Emeltee
 

DaveHam9

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#18
Chartist Intelligence .
The Northern Star and National Trades' Journal (Leeds, England), Saturday, October 11, 1851; Issue 727. British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900.
...
POLITICAL VICTIMS' ASSOCIATION.
...
Among the ladies, we must not forget Mrs. Ash, the founder of the Sheffield Female Chartist Association, and Mrs. Martin ...


I've been searching different phrases including 'ash' 1 Jan 1837 to 31 Dec 1851 and getting very few hits that are actually ash and not ashforth, ash... etc...
 
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DaveHam9

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#19
Chartist Intelligence .
The Northern Star and National Trades' Journal (Leeds, England), Saturday, August 10, 1850; Issue 668. British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900
 
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DaveHam9

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#20
LOCAL INTELLIGENCE .
The Sheffield & Rotherham Independent (Sheffield, England), Saturday, April 26, 1851; pg. 8; Issue 1646. British Library Newspapers, Part II: 1800-1900
 
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