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Research the dead. Forget the living.

gibbo

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#4
benny1982;217805Could it be the dead just seem more interesting?[/QUOTE said:
Or could it be that the 100 year rule on a lot of records puts a spanner in the works when researching more recent times.

Gee stuffed up the quote things didnt i.
 

Ellie7

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#5
I never bothered with the death records for years, just had down too Great Grandfather Thomas Ernest d1945.
Only last 5/7 years I have started looking for burials.
Up until my Husbands death ,I only had his family Tree, not mine.

Deaths never interested me.

Ellie
 

emeltee

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#6
I think we are also more interested in where/who we came from rather than who came with us. The history rather than the present. We are in the present, we weren't in the history.

Emeltee
 

benny1982

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#7
I think we do seem to pay less attention to living relatives and pay more attention to relatives who died before we were born. Living rellies we know about whereas dead rellies we want to find out about.
 

p.risboy

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#8
I think I'm getting confused, which isn't that surprising.:2fun:

They had to be alive, to be dead. If we find the dead, what can they tell us. Who, where and how. And who registered the death, I suppose.

But pre registration, some of that information does not exist. The how is mostly missing, and who they belong to is missing, and where they actualy lived, could be missing. Pre-reg. deaths/burials are not always the place they lived.

Is it the case, that a death is found, then the hunt goes on for where they actualy came from, and who their family were.:confused:

Or am I missing the point somewhere, which I guess I am.:2fun:


Steve.:)
 

Ladybird1300

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#9
I suppose that's why I started to see how many people out there are still living. I'm running out of close living relatives, so looking for anyone a bit more distant still living.:biggrin:

Amanda
 

p.risboy

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#10
I suppose that's why I started to see how many people out there are still living. I'm running out of close living relatives, so looking for anyone a bit more distant still living.:biggrin:

Amanda
I started my FH hunt, with a photo and the name of my Uncle, and not my father.
I didn't set out to start my family history quest, until this chap dropped in my lap, when my Auntie died in 2004.
He was alway known as Uncle Charlie......and that was it. BUT, he was in uniform, so off I went.

So I guess it's his fault that I'm still doing this almost 14 years later.


Steve.:)
 

benny1982

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#11
I was more talking about the fact that we can become addicted to genealogy that we forget the family. It is like we are more into finding the death of a great great grandad than getting the dinner ready for the family, or helping with the washing, shopping :D.
 

emeltee

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#12
As the saying goes, if the cap fits, wear it.

I have a tendency to use genealogy as an excuse to avoid housework, which I find very tedious. Genealogy is so much more interesting and challenging. What's challenging about dusting, particularly when you know you are going to have to do it again in a day or two.

Emeltee
 

p.risboy

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#15
In my lounge and dining room, there are four built in dressers.......60 small panes of glass at 6x8 inches, two shelves, and 4 doors,(with 6 panels each), in total, plus outer frames and trimmings, and about 9 feet tall.:eek::eek:

If anyone thinks, that it's going to get dusted once a week....dream on. With two open fires, two dogs, two adults, and numerous creepy crawlies......visitors, the odd bird or two, it will be done when I can't see the books behind the glass.:2fun::2fun:

But, looking for dead people, as Ben puts it, will always be a close second to my breakfast.:2fun::2fun:
 

benny1982

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#16
For instance you are in the middle of trying to solve a conundrum on great great grandpa Smith and the living relative say "Fancy going for a walk" or "Can I borrow that computer as I need a new toaster". You think "But I have dead people to research".
 

Ladybird1300

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#17
I was more talking about the fact that we can become addicted to genealogy that we forget the family. It is like we are more into finding the death of a great great grandad than getting the dinner ready for the family, or helping with the washing, shopping :D.
You speak for yourself, I still have to do those things!!!:2fun:


Amanda
 

benny1982

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#18
And when a lovely theory on an ancestor is ripped apart by unfortunate facts we tend to see that as if we have lost a million pounds. Such as you find the potential ancestor died as a child or married another spouse.
 
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