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Restoring historical areas of cities?

benny1982

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#1
After the war a lot of ugly post war buildings were built in cities including historical ones. Now many are being demolished and the historical pattern is being reintroduced in some areas. Do you think this is a good idea?
 

p.risboy

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#2
I don't think so Ben. If it's gone, it's gone. If it's rebuilt, even to the same architecture it's still new.
But the 'concrete blocks, that are being demolished now, should be replaced with something that is 'tomorrow', but built to last.
We can't keep looking backwards all the time. But they should also keep the historic buildings, even the humble ones, in good condition and well maintained.

Can't please all the people all the time.:rolleyes:

Steve.:)
 

astwood

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#3
>:D I am waiting to find out how the two new projects
for birmingham will look like The new Central Library
and The new New Street Railway Station the plans
look good lets hope the finished product will do them
justice
astwood
 

Edward

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#5
>:D I am waiting to find out how the two new projects
for birmingham will look like The new Central Library
and The new New Street Railway Station the plans
look good lets hope the finished product will do them
justice
astwood
It couldn't be worse than the old outside for new street station made to look like a 1970's shopping centre. completely devoid of any interest.

ED
 

astwood

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#7
Like i said lets see the finished products of the Central Library
and New Street Station there has got to be an improvement
to each of them we need some decent architects these days
astwood>:D
 

p.risboy

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#9
Like everything these days, it's all built to 'show', rather than 'last'. 25yr lifespan for a building seems value for money these days.

Steel, glass and concrete. Sections made off site, and then transported and assembled on site. Kit buildings.
Where has all the brick,stone and mortar gone. Too expensive, they say.

Then we have recycled timber chips, formed into beams and trusses and houses assembled in days, instead if weeks.

Time will tell with these modern construction methods.:rolleyes:

I would think most of us have lived in a georgian/victorian/edwardian houses at some point, and they are still standing now.
Now that is real sustainability. 150-200 yrs and still standing.

Steve.:)
 

benny1982

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#12
That just about sums it up then Ben. It lasted 29 years, could be seen as a triumph.:) :D
How long was it empty before it was demolished.?

Steve.:)
Well I shall start from the beginning. The first wards opened in 1975 and the building was fully occupied by 1976. The wards were starting to be vacated in 2001 and it was empty by the end of 2002 and demolished in late 2003. It was in service for 27 years. It did its duty that building but the operating theatres in the basement kept cracking. Windows occasionally fell out and the lifts were unreliable for patients. A new hospital opened just outside the city in 2002.

The building probably would have survived longer if it was more sturdily built and even been reused after the hospital closed when the new one was opened.

Ben
 

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