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Shropshire genealogy.

solidrock2

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#1
I am not familiar with Welsh genealogy and usually stay clear of it but now I need some answers. :unsure: Shropshire is pretty close to Wales and all the records I have found seem different to the norm.
I have a Jenkyn Cambrae b1326 who married Dorothy Collins in 1351. Jenkyn's father was John le Cambray, record states John le Cambray (ap Rhys), which I assume is son of Rhys. Going further Rhys ap Dafydd, son of Dafydd, but there is no mention of family name which I assume to be Cambray or Cambrae and it's like this all the way down the line. Im I right in my assumption or do I have to guess at the family name. :rolleyes:o_O:unsure::coffee:
 

p.risboy

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#4
Surnames were generaly of the place they lived......or their craft. like John the Bowman, or John the Fletcher,, John the Baker, John the Smith, John of France, John of Linley, John of the Wood, John of the Forest, John of the Hill. etc etc etc.
 

solidrock2

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#10
Thank you Ellie for all that info, I did'nt know about the start of family names, that may explain how Jenkyn Cambrae's family name suddenly became Jenkes with the birth of his son in 1352.
 

solidrock2

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#11
I was looking at that tree on Geni the other day, seems to go back a fair way but there are no sources so where did the owner get the info from? A few years ago I helped someone with theirs tree and got back to Viking kings and queens but I was able to back it all up following the history books. This Jenkes family is ok to around the time of Henry VIII as history books verify the facts.
 

Ellie7

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#12
WOLVERTON, part of Eaton-under-Heywood manor, (fn. 169) was subinfeudated by the prior of Wenlock before 1255, when John of Westhope was lord. (fn. 170) In 1623 the Jenkes family, for long lords of Wolverton, traced their ancestry back several generations before John ap Rees, or le Cambray (fl. 1323-4), the first head of the family said to be of Wolverton. (fn. 171) From his descendant Jenkyn Cambray (fl. 1400) son followed father, the following being lords: John Jenkes, Thomas Jenkes, John Jenkes, Rowland Jenkes (fl. 1497- 1521), (fn. 172) John Jenkes, Thomas Jenkes, George Jenkes (fl. 1570-1600, granted arms 1584), Francis Jenkes (d. 1627), (fn. 173) and Herbert Jenkes (d. 1654). Wolverton apparently passed to Herbert Jenkes's daughter Margaret (d. 1674), who married Bartholomew Lutley (sheriff 1706, (fn. 174) d. 1716). The Lutleys' son Philip, next lord, also became lord of Eaton-under-Heywood, and the two manors descended together until the 1780s when John Barneby sold Wolverton to Peter Beck. Beck (d. 1798) was succeeded by his son Peter (d. 1824), a Shrewsbury banker, whose widow Hannah (d. 1859) had the 306-a. Wolverton farm in 1842. (fn. 175) In the later 19th and early 20th century Wolverton was part of the Warren family's settled estate, (fn. 176) which was split up and sold off after J. Loxdale Warren's death in 1909
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/salop/vol10/pp320-333
 

solidrock2

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#13
WOLVERTON, part of Eaton-under-Heywood manor, (fn. 169) was subinfeudated by the prior of Wenlock before 1255, when John of Westhope was lord. (fn. 170) In 1623 the Jenkes family, for long lords of Wolverton, traced their ancestry back several generations before John ap Rees, or le Cambray (fl. 1323-4), the first head of the family said to be of Wolverton. (fn. 171) From his descendant Jenkyn Cambray (fl. 1400) son followed father, the following being lords: John Jenkes, Thomas Jenkes, John Jenkes, Rowland Jenkes (fl. 1497- 1521), (fn. 172) John Jenkes, Thomas Jenkes, George Jenkes (fl. 1570-1600, granted arms 1584), Francis Jenkes (d. 1627), (fn. 173) and Herbert Jenkes (d. 1654). Wolverton apparently passed to Herbert Jenkes's daughter Margaret (d. 1674), who married Bartholomew Lutley (sheriff 1706, (fn. 174) d. 1716). The Lutleys' son Philip, next lord, also became lord of Eaton-under-Heywood, and the two manors descended together until the 1780s when John Barneby sold Wolverton to Peter Beck. Beck (d. 1798) was succeeded by his son Peter (d. 1824), a Shrewsbury banker, whose widow Hannah (d. 1859) had the 306-a. Wolverton farm in 1842. (fn. 175) In the later 19th and early 20th century Wolverton was part of the Warren family's settled estate, (fn. 176) which was split up and sold off after J. Loxdale Warren's death in 1909
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/salop/vol10/pp320-333
Thank you Ellie already have all that, it makes interesting reading. The jenkes were also part of Henry VIII's court together with a bit of scandle. I think I will stop at Jenkyn Cambray as going down his line seems to be a headache and it's not my family, doing this for a friend.:)
 
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Hello. I am a member of the Jenks family. I am wondering more about solidrock2's comment "The jenkes were also part of Henry VIII's court together with a bit of scandal." I would love to know more about this
 
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#15
Hello. I am a member of the Jenks family. I am wondering more about solidrock2's comment "The jenkes were also part of Henry VIII's court together with a bit of scandal." I would love to know more about this
Hi, It's been a long time since I did the tree for a friend so I will have to back track a bit to see what I found. It was


Lady Elizabeth Jenkes

who married...


Lord Richard Rich



















https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiW84G8_e_sAhVkzIsBHSb9C4o4ChAWMAB6BAgBEAI&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.genealogieonline.nl%2Fen%2Fcolgan-family-tree%2FP2686.php&usg=AOvVaw2TeHuiD5YVmAW_HyHe-9WL









 
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#17
OK, here we go. Lady Elizabeth Jenkes 1510-1588 was the wife of Lord Richard Rich, (Baron Rich of Leighs), 1496 - 1567. He was part of Henry VIII's court which would put Lady Elizabeth there as well. This is were it gets complicated but the history books seem to confirm it. The mother of Lord Richard Rich was Joan Dingley she was a washer woman in the court of Henry VIII and allegedly one of his mistresses. She had a daughter Ethelreda in 1543 who seems to have been adopted by Richard and Elizabeth and claim as their own.

"Ethelreda is allegedly the daughter of Henry VIII"

"Ethelreda is allegedly the daughter of Henry VIII by his mistress Joan Dingley who was the widow of Richard Rich who died in 1567. Joan was a laundresses to the King."

jenkes.jpg
 

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