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special inmate

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cumbria
#1
Hi there
New to the site and I hope some one can help
On looking for a Thomas Ashworth b 1837 Preston (Grt Grt Grandfather )
On the 1871 census it says that he was a Special in mate at
Barracks for 3rs Royal Lancre Militia ,Preston
on the original census it says he was a slipper maker and Volenteer Corp but there is a line through that
Has anyone got any idea what a special inmate would mean ?
His wife and children were living at a different address in queen St Preston

Thanks Jackey
 

leefer

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swindon wilts
#2
Hi Jackey and welcome,i am just guessing that he was a Special(term for a soldier,policeman etc)..think inmate might have just been another word for living at the barracks...of course i am probably wrong and be patient as there are plenty of people on here who will try and help...feel free with any questions..all the best ...Lee
 

oznannie

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Rockingham
#3
Hi
If you look at the start of census page, he was in the Militia Barracks as a volunteer.
You will see the regular army people listed with their families.
Back track through the pages & you will see lots more.
I'd ignore Anc## transcription as special inmate.
I have tried & tried with them to change their criteria to allow for jobs/etc to no avail.
oznannie
 
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Leeds, born Hull
#4
hi
If Thomas was a volunteer, I agree with Leefer about the term Special

Inmate I believe means he was living/sleeping there, rather than a day visitor,
This is supported by his wife living elsewhere. Also applies to Workhouses, where an inmate lives there, but could go out to work each day

dave
 

Gerard

Well-known member
#5
At the time in question volunteer soldiers were not regular soldiers. They were something more akin to what was to become the Territorial Army.

I think that the enumerator has created a term i.e Special Inmate to differentiate them from the regular soldiers. These "Special Inmates" were probably only staying in the barracks for a short period of time.

Militia regulars tended to sometimes look down upon the volunteers.

Cheers,

Gerard
 
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cumbria
#6
Thankyou so much for your replys

Ive checked the original censu s for 1871
under the heading for relationship to head of family it says special inmate
however under the heading for occupation it says
Volenteer corp then slipper maker and a line straight through it
it was the term special inmate that through me
why couldnt they just put volenteer ?
I just need to find what regiment he was in now :eek:
But thanks again
Jackey
 
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#7
Hi its me again
I did what you said and went back tracked over the census and he was in 3rd Royal lancs
Why did I not think of doin that before :confused:
Thanks again
Jackey
 
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Location
cumbria
#8
Hi there
Still having problems with Thomas Ashworth
On the original census the adress is Militia Barracks of the 3rd Royal Lancs
and the address just before it on the same page is New Hall Lane Ive googled bothe the addresses and not coming up with anything
and cant seem to find anything about the 3rd Royal Lancs in 1871
Ive googled till Im goggled :eek:
Can any of you point me in the right direction please
Jackey xx
 
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Leeds, born Hull
#9
Hi
found this bit about the 1881 reforms
There were 3 battallions in the East Lancs reg. 1 and 2 were regular units, 3
was a Militia and volunteer/training/territorial battalion
The reforms linked the militia and rifle volunteer units of the area into the regimental structure:

The 5th Royal Lancashire Militia was redesignated as the 3rd (Militia) Battalion of the East Lancashire Regiment.[1]

The 2nd Lancashire Rifle Volunteer Corps, based at Blackburn: renamed to 1st Volunteer Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment in 1889[1]
The 3rd Lancashire Rifle Volunteer Corps, based at Burnley: renamed to 2nd Volunteer Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment in 1889[1]

The militia was a reserve force that was only liable to service in the United Kingdom and in peace time assembled for period of annual training. In time of war it could be "embodied" or mobilised. When the war that broke out in South Africa in 1899 began to absorb a large amount of the regular army's resources, the terms of service of the militia were altered to allow them to serve in the war. The 3rd Battalion was embodied in January 1900 and served in South Africa until 1902. It was disembodied in March 1902. The battalion was awarded the battle honour "South Africa 1900–1902".[2]

The volunteer battalions were organised for home defence purposes, and their members were subject to regular drills and training. Like the militia battalion, elements of the volunteers fought in South Africa. While members of the Volunteer Force could not be required to serve overseas, members from the battalions were voluntarily formed into Active Service Companies, providing reinforcements for the regular battalion. Both volunteer battalions were awarded battle honours for the war.[3] [4]


East Lancashire Regiment
Active 1 July 1881–1 July 1958
Country United Kingdom
Branch Army
Type Line Infantry
Garrison/HQ Burnley (1881 – 1898), Fulwood Barracks, Preston (1898 on)
Motto Spectamur agendo (judge us by our deeds)
Colors White facings
Engagements Second Boer War, Western Front (World War I), Battle of Dunkirk, Burma Campaign

dave
 

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