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Will "I hereby exclude all others"

Location
.
From
Ireland-Eire
I've obtained a number of wills in my family tree hunt. They are all for family in Tyrone in Northern Ireland.

One important one lists all the children as beneficiaries except for the eldest child. At the end the parent says "I hereby exclude all others not mentioned in above will from any share or part of my estate". Now, I know that the eldest child had a falling out with the rest of the family and that can explain why they weren't mentioned as a beneficiary. However, I was wondering whether the exclusion is a specific reference to this too? Was the parent trying to make sure the child couldn't make a claim afterwards?

I haven't seen such a phrase in the other wills I have and wondered whether the phrase is unusual? All the wills I have date from late 1800s/early 1900s except for this one which was 1940, so perhaps it was a legal development that such a phrase started being used?

Any thoughts welcome.
 
Hello marto65,

welcome to FHUK.

I'm sure someone will have a good answer but I noticed this in one so it does not seem uncommon:

... in equal shares and I declare I have hereby purposely excluded my eldest son ...

Regards,

Dave
 
I think it's a reference to the falling out because I too have a Will similar in as much it excluded a child, however her father was more specific.

He wrote,

"To my daughter Ann, who married William Musgrove, a thresher, who Must not benefit from my demise in any way shape or form because she has had more than her fair share in my lifetime"
 
It could be a falling out or it could be that the person had been provided for in some other way that all knew about and accepted.

In the case of one of my ancestors, the eldest son inherited the bakery shop and he was not mentioned in his father's will. There was no falling out. He had already be catered ( :2fun: ) for.
 
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